Africa
7:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Conservationist Shot In Africa's Oldest Nature Preserve

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 10:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. In the Democratic Republic of Congo this past week, a noted conservationist is recovering from gunshot wounds after an attack by unknown assailants. Forty-three-year-old Emmanuel de Merode is a Belgian Prince. He is also the director of Africa's oldest nature preserve, Virunga National Park. It's a world heritage site and one of the most bio diverse places on Earth. Nearly a quarter of the world's critically endangered mountain gorillas live in the park.

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Around the Nation
7:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Legal At Last, Colorado's Pot Contest Gets Competitively Mellow

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 10:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today, some 30,000 people will converge in Denver, Colo. for the 5th annual Cannabis Cup, a marijuana festival and tradeshow. It's the first time the event is being held after legal marijuana sales went into effect January 1 of this year. To learn more about the event, we're joined by Ricardo Baca. He's the editor of "The Cannabist" blog at the Denver Post. Thanks so much for being with us, Ricardo.

RICARDO BACA: Hey. Thank you.

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Europe
7:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Ukraine's Divide, Too Broad For Easter To Bridge?

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 10:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Asia
7:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Measures Of Change After Bangladesh Garment Factory Collapse

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 10:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

One year ago, the clothing manufacturing industry suffered its deadliest accident in history. An eight-story building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 people. Many were garment workers making cheap clothes for U.S. and European manufacturers. At the time, those corporations came under intense pressure for lax safety standards. To find out if and how the industry has responded, I'm joined by Steven Greenhouse. He's a labor and workplace reporter for the New York Times. Thanks so much for being with us.

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Asia
7:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

S. Korean Community Waits And Prays For Its Missing Students

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 10:53 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. For the first time since a ferry capsized and sank off the coast of South Korea Wednesday, divers have begun to recover bodies from inside the sunken vessel. The death toll has passed 50 with more than 250 still missing. Most of the passengers were students from a single high school outside the capital city. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on the community and how they're coping.

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Asia
7:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Hindu Nationalist Topping Polls In World's Largest Election

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 10:53 am

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Europe
7:07 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Tiny Liechtenstein Loses A Precious Quarter-Acre

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 8:37 am

The tiny principality of Liechtenstein spreads across a grand total of 62 square miles. Now, it's getting smaller.

The Two-Way
3:49 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Relatives Grieve As Divers Pull Bodies From S. Korean Ferry

Rescue workers carry the body of a passenger from the ferry that sank Wednesday off the coast of South Korea.
Lee Jin-man AP

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 6:31 am

The recovery operation at the site of a sunken ferry off the South Korean coast continues Sunday, as police boats brought bodies ashore to the deafening cries and screams of family members, said CNN.

The grim work is just beginning: About 250 people are still missing. The death toll now stands at 52, South Korean disaster officials told reporters Sunday. Twenty-three of the dead are students.

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National Security
4:49 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

Training For An Uncertain Military Future In The Calif. Desert

Soldiers assigned to the 120th Combined Arms Battalion, 30th Heavy Brigade Combat Team, participate in desert training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., in 2009.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 5:28 pm

In the middle of the Mojave Desert, between Los Angeles and Las Vegas, there is a place that looks just like Afghanistan.

There are villages with houses, shops, a mosque and a marketplace. But it is all a facade. The area is actually a U.S. Army installation, the Fort Irwin National Training Center. If you want to see how a decade of fighting has profoundly changed the way the U.S. prepares its soldiers for war, this is where you come.

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World
4:39 pm
Sat April 19, 2014

Russia's Military: Threatening Enough To Avoid Using Force?

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 5:28 pm

Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.

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