The Two-Way
12:40 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Mudslide Volunteers: 'We're Going In Whether You Let Us Or Not'

A worker uses a chain saw at the scene of the deadly mudslide near Oso, Wash.
Rick Wilking AP

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 3:52 pm

When emergency personnel got to the scene of Saturday's mudslide near Oso, Wash., they kept people away. Much of a mountain had torn off, roared across the Stillaguamish River, and destroyed about 50 homes and properties.

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Shots - Health News
11:54 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Marathon Training Lowers Heart Disease Risk In Middle-Aged Men

Runners head out during the start of the 115th Boston Marathon on April 18, 2011, in Hopkinton, Mass.
Elsa Garrison/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 8:48 pm

It seems like every cubicle dweller I know is training for a marathon. But then there are those tragic headlines about middle-aged runners keeling over dead at the finish line. Is this really a good idea?

Marathon training actually reduces a person's cardiovascular risk, according to a study presented Thursday at the American College of Cardiology's scientific sessions in Washington, D.C. That's true even if they're just average recreational runners, not elite athletes.

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The Two-Way
11:12 am
Thu March 27, 2014

After Blocking Twitter, Turkey Moves To Stop YouTube

A man tries to get connected to YouTube with his tablet at a cafe in Istanbul on Thursday.
Osman Orsal Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 12:50 pm

Authorities in Turkey are reportedly going ahead with a ban on access to YouTube days after a similar move in the country to block Twitter.

The Turkish telecommunications authority TIB is quoted in Turkish state media as saying it has taken an "administrative measure" against YouTube.

The news follows earlier reports that a recording, allegedly of a meeting among top Turkish officials discussing military intervention in Syria, was posted on YouTube.

Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan on Thursday lashed out against the post:

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The Salt
11:09 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Can The Meat Industry Help Protect Wildlife? Some Say Yes

Fox Ranch, outside Yuma County, Colo., is a 14,000-acre nature preserve and working cattle ranch owned by The Nature Conservancy. The ranch is an experiment in planned grazing, which aims to improve soil health and help ranchers' bottom lines.
Luke Runyon Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 2:15 pm

Last week we reported on a new campaign from the Center for Biological Diversity that hopes to persuade Americans to cut back on their meat consumption. Their pitch? Eat less meat and you will help save wildlife.

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The Two-Way
11:06 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Review Done For Gov. Christie's Office Absolves Him In Bridge Scandal

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 5:42 pm

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's "account of these events rings true" and he has "conducted himself at every turn as someone who has nothing to hide," according to an investigation — done at the request of the governor's office — of the George Washington Bridge scandal.

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The Two-Way
10:24 am
Thu March 27, 2014

German Man To Return Paintings From Cache Of Nazi-Looted Art

An obituary card with a portrait of German art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt (1895-1956), the father of Cornelius Gurlitt, in a folder at the municipal archive in Duesseldorf, Germany.
Rolf Vennenbernd EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 7:38 am

A German man who for years had hidden away art plundered by the Nazis during World War II has agreed to return the valuable works to their Jewish owners or their descendants, his lawyer said Wednesday.

Cornelius Gurlitt will start with returning Matisse's Seated Woman/Woman Sitting in Armchair to the descendants of Paul Rosenberg, who was a French art dealer whose descendants recognized the painting when details of the stash were made public in November.

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Obama Lays Out His Plan To Have Telecoms Store Call Data

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:33 am

Following up on his acknowledgement in January that it's problematic to have the National Security Agency collecting and storing massive amounts of information about individuals' phone calls, President Obama announced Thursday that he has decided "the data should remain at the telephone companies."

NPR's Tamara Keith tells our Newscast Desk that:

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Shots - Health News
9:41 am
Thu March 27, 2014

A Booming Economy Doesn't Save Children From Malnutrition

Indian schoolchildren wait in line for food at a government primary school in Hyderabad, India. Consistent access to nutritious food and clean water is key to helping children thrive, researchers say.
Noah Seelam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:29 am

Lack of food is the leading cause of child death worldwide, killing 3.1 million children each year and accounting for 45 percent of all child mortality.

Undernourished children who survive still face a daunting future, including reduced intellectual capacity and a higher risk of disease and disability. And while economic growth is presumed to get more children fed, a booming economy alone doesn't fix the problem, researchers say.

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The Two-Way
9:39 am
Thu March 27, 2014

'Do It For Denmark' Video Urges Danes To Go All The Way

An image from "Do it for Denmark," which urges Danes to get going.
Spies Rejser video

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:38 am

While The Washington Post Morning Mix blog helpfully digs into statistics about Denmark's low birth rate and slow population growth, we'll get right to the point:

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The Two-Way
9:01 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Sentenced To Death 46 Years Ago, Japanese Man Is Now Free

Iwao Hakamada before he went to prison in 1966 and after his release on Thursday. Now 78, he was sentenced to death in 1968 for the murders of four people and may have been the world's longest-serving death row inmate. Newly analyzed DNA evidence indicates he may be innocent. A retrial has been ordered.
Kyodo/Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 10:36 am

A Japanese man who may have been on death row longer than anyone else in the world walked out of prison on Thursday after newly analyzed DNA evidence prompted a judge to order that he be retried.

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