The Two-Way
12:32 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

Mystery Bidder At French Auction Plans To Return Sacred Hopi Items

An anonymous bidder paid $530,000 for 24 Native American items that went on the block this week in Paris. The auction went ahead despite an appeal by the Hopi tribe to cancel the sale of the items it considers sacred. The U.S. Embassy asked for a delay, and the sale was challenged in court — unsuccessfully.

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$14 million dollars
12:24 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

Antigo Cheesemaker To Expand, Jobs Added

Credit sartoricheese.com

A $14 million expansion and renovation project at the Sartori cheese facilities in Antigo and Plymouth was announced Wednesday by the state.

The expansion is expected to bring 53 new jobs to the two facilities.

Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation spokesperson Mark Maley(mail-lee) says the project will enable the fourth-generation family-owned company to update equipment in its 100-year-old facility in Antigo, improve employee working conditions, enhance safety and sustainability initiatives while expanding capacity....

 

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
11:52 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Debate: Should We Avoid Eating Anything With A Face?

Dr. Neal Barnard, Gene Baur, Chris Masterjohn and Joel Salatin debate eating meat for Intelligence Squared with moderator John Donvan.
Samuel LaHoz Intelligence Squared U.S.
  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

A doctor, a vegan, a researcher and a farmer recently waded into a hot-button topic in the food world: Is it a bad idea to eat meat?

They faced off two against two on the topic for the Intelligence Squared U.S. series. In an Oxford-style debate, they delved into the medical, ethical and environmental arguments surrounding the motion "Don't Eat Anything With A Face."

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The Two-Way
11:49 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Sebelius Calls For Review Of HHS Practices That Led To Debacle

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius testifies on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Earlier today, Sebelius announced an inquiry into the agency's launch of the problem-plagued HealthCare.gov site.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 6:14 pm

"The launch of HealthCare.gov was flawed and simply unacceptable."

Those are the words of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, published Wednesday just before she met with people who share those views: members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

With her agency under fire since the website's failed release last month, Sebelius announced an internal inquiry and other steps that will focus on improving the contracting process, project management and employee training.

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Law
11:43 am
Wed December 11, 2013

No Cake For You: Saying 'I Don't' To Same-Sex Marriage

A Colorado judge recently ordered Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, to serve gay couples, after he refused to make a cake for a same-sex wedding.
Lindsay Pierce Denver Post via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 3:15 pm

There were a few snickers when a Colorado state judge ruled that a baker has to produce wedding cakes for gay couples even though he opposes same-sex marriage on religious grounds.

A cake? What's the big deal?

But the decision, handed down late last week, is just the latest slice in a debate that has gone front burner with gay marriage now legalized in 16 states, and counting.

Can individual businesspeople like Jack Phillips of Masterpiece Cakeshop in suburban Denver be compelled to provide wedding (or commitment ceremony) goods and services to gay couples?

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Oneida county case
11:37 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Bible Camp Rehearing Request Denied By Court

Credit Eagle Cove Camp and Conference Center

The 7th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago has denied a rehearing on a decision against a family hoping to build a bible camp and conference center on Squash Lake.

The Jaros Family has tried for nearly a decade to build the facility on family owned land in the town of Woodboro, Oneida county. Oneida county and the town of Woodboro, along with the Oneida County Board of Adjustment have all denied needed permits.

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Faith Matters
11:35 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Is Pope Francis Really 'The People's Pope'?

Pope Francis greets his papal audience.
Marco Campagna

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 7:53 am

Time magazine has dubbed Pope Francis its Person of the Year, calling him "The People's Pope." This title comes weeks after he criticized aspects of the global economy and "unbridled consumerism" in a document called an apostolic exhortation. Host Michel Martin recently spoke with a group of practicing Catholics about how Pope Francis has inspired them in their faith.


Interview Highlights

Author Michael Sean Winters: What the pope's exhortation puts into focus

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World
11:05 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Who Is The Next Mandela?

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 7:53 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, Pope Francis is Time magazine's person of the year for 2013. We'll talk about how the pope is changing both the Catholic Church and its relationship to the world. That's in a few minutes.

But first, mourning continues in South Africa for anti-apartheid hero Nelson Mandela. Some 100 leaders and dignitaries from around the world attended a memorial service in Soweto yesterday. And U.S. President Barack Obama was among the many speakers.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Lululemon Bets New Leaders Will Help It See Through Woes

Lululemon clothes at a store in Pasadena, Calif.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 11:27 am

Yoga clothier Lululemon began the year with an embarrassing problem — pants that allowed way too much of women's bottoms to be seen through their sheer fabric.

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The Salt
10:37 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Robots Could Help Farmers Rein In Fertilizer Pollution

Rowbot is designed to fit in between the rows of crops. Moving up and down each row, a fleet of 20 bots could fertilize and monitor the corn crops during the growing season.
Courtesy of Kent Cavender-Bares

Originally published on Wed December 11, 2013 11:00 am

Lately, robots have been taking over all kinds of jobs that humans used to do on the farm — from thinning lettuce to harvesting spinach.

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