Emily Bright

Interim Community Features Editor/ Feature Contributor

Emily Bright is a freelance writer, educator, and radio producer living in Eagle River. She is the author of the poetry chapbook Glances Back and the co-author of Powerful Ideas in Teaching: Creating Environments Where Students Want to Learn. Find her at www.emilykbright.com.

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Drizzling rain on Memorial Day was no deterrent for Eagle River residents and visitors, who showed up at the Veterans’ Memorial Park to honor those who gave their lives in service to this country. Former marine officer Dick Leinenkugel of the Leinenkugel beer family spoke in honor of the nearly one million service members who have died, including 55 Vilas County residents since the Civil War. Citing  a former Catholic chaplain in the marines, Father Dennis O’Brian, Leinenkugel said,

A sewing machine can be a tool for creativity or the means for providing livelihood for your family. One Wisconsin woman turned her love of sewing into an international organization that has helped thousands. WXPR’s Emily Bright spoke with Margaret Jankowski of The Sewing Machine Project when she spoke at Many Ways of Peace in Eagle River...

Remember that old MasterCard commercial, asserting that that value of some things are priceless? What about clean water? Emily Bright brings us a new Vilas County study that puts an economic value on its surface water—and it might be higher than you think.

"Are you really going out today?"

"Oh, yeah. I surf all winter in New York so, it’s all good."

Sometimes a family's history has some interesting stories. WXPR's Emily Bright tells us sometimes there are stories in a family's past that are very unusual. This feature comes in two parts: Act 1: A Prohibition Mystery and Act 2: The Matchmaking Photograph.

This is the first of some Northwoods family stories...and perhaps yours could be a part of that, too. If you want to have your genealogy story told, contact Emily Bright at 715-362-6000.

Tom Freeman

In their heyday in the earlier part of the 1900s, boathouses were far more than just a place to store your boat. Now more than 30 years have passed since new boathouses have been built. Emily Bright spoke to one Manitowish Waters man dedicated to documenting this unique Northwoods architecture....

    

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A debate at the Eagle River City Council meeting Tuesday night   whether to continue to add fluoride into its water highlighted the importance of oral hygiene—not just for your teeth, but for your overall health. WXPR’s Emily Bright has more...

en.wikipedia.org

Dr. Atul Gawande’s book "Being Mortal" zoomed onto bestseller lists when it came out in October, and 6 months later it’s one of Amazon’s top 50 most popular books. People are hungry for a way to talk about health care and—yes—death. WXPR’s Emily Bright reports that the same is true in the Northwoods.

Wisconsin DNR

 

The Vilas County Board voted Tuesday to allow ATVs to ride on defined sections of county trunk highways as part of a larger ATV route that spans Eagle River, Conover, Lincoln, and Phelps. ATVs will be allowed to run on the road where signage permits, but they must stay as far to the side as practicable. There is no set date for when those signs will go up, though ATV riders are hopeful that they can start this spring.

Meanwhile, Vilas, Forest and Oneida counties could be joining forces to provide public transportation to some of its residents.

Emily Bright / WXPR News

 

  More than any other instrument, violins have a mystique. We assume the best violins were made centuries ago—so when in recent studies, blindfolded violin masters preferred modern instruments over multi-million dollar Stradivari, many people were shocked. WXPR’s Emily Bright spoke to one Wisconsin luthier who wasn’t surprised at all.   

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Warm weather has drawn people out of their homes for a number of spring activities including one popular Northwoods pastime: tapping trees for maple syrup. As Emily Bright reports, the season has begun, and much earlier than last year.

Maple syrup enthusiasts have been out tapping trees this week, as the warm daytime temperatures and freezing nights make sap start to run. Speaking from the winter farmers’ market, Tonya Hofrichter of Hofrichter farms in Deerbrook says the sap has had a slow start.

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