Jeremy Holtz

Feature Contributor

Jeremy Holtz is a Wisconsin native. After starting college with plans of teaching high school music, he got married and left school to re-evaluate his long-term career goals. It took a couple of years, but he returned to college to study natural resource conservation. He ultimately earned his Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Biology from Colorado State University in 1998. He worked in Colorado, Kansas, Wisconsin, and Minnesota before returning to Wisconsin as a Wildlife Biologist in Florence in 2006. After five years in Florence, he transferred to Rhinelander, where he has lived with his wife Carol, and their three sons Jay, Brett, and Trey since fall 2011.

Jeremy's series Wildlife Matters can be heard most weeks during Morning Edition on WXPR.

USFWS

A few weeks back I was pleased and proud to have a unique opportunity to mentor a youth hunter. 

Rob Burke

Many people gather firewood from fallen or dead trees on their own lands or from national forest or state-owned property.  In today’s Wildlife Matters, DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz says in some cases, managers may choose to leave those trees alone for the benefit of wildlife.  

Karen Laubenstein / US Fish and Wildlife Service

You never know what kind of wildlife you might run into when you’re out and about in the Northwoods.

In today’s Wildlife Matters, DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz says some sightings are easier to prove than others. 

U.S. Forest Service

  When I lived in Colorado, I tried to get out hunting whenever I could. I usually went small game hunting, 

  seeking jackrabbits, rocky mountain cottontails, coyotes or grouse. I would try to use a combination of maps and atlases to find land open to public hunting. I would take my old AMC Gremlin as far down the trail as I could, and then I would start walking.

Submitted photo

Bear hunting season closes Tuesday.  And for the past week, bear hunting has been open only to those using hounds.  It’s an approach that tends to bring out strong emotions in people…who are either devoted or opposed to hound hunting. 

In today’s Wildlife Matters, DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz shares his first experiences…hunting bear both ways. 

Dick Daniels

Temperatures are dropping, and as we move closer to winter many species are migrating south.  

  In today’s Wildlife Matters, DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz talks about the different ways birds make the trip.

My mom always used to tell me that hummingbirds traveled south for the winter riding on the backs of Canada geese.  While this is a charming and compelling tale, the fact is that these little birds migrate the same way all other birds do – they fly. 

US Forest Service

With the fall season officially upon us…many people may be experiencing some bittersweet feelings about the transition towards winter.  In today’s Wildlife Matters, DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz shares his reflections on the end of a relatively cool season…that he argues shouldn’t be considered a summer at all.    

Kristie Gianopulos / http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domesticated_turkey#mediaviewer/File:Baby_turkey_in_FL.jpg

In the years I have worked for the Department of Natural Resources, one of the most common tales I hear repeated involves dropping rattlesnakes from helicopters to control turkey populations. Some of you are convinced this happens; others frankly find the idea absurd. However, I have to field this question, or accusation, a few times every year, so I thought I would explore the topic in further detail.

environmentalgeography.wordpress.com

Deer season is drawing nearer, and that means hunters will have to face a variety of changes in the way the state is managing deer.  In today’s Wildlife Matters, DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz talks about one of the key changes – the creation of county deer advisory councils.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lazymonkey/348519518/

Bear hunting isn’t for everyone.  But its increasing popularity means that for those who do it, the wait times are getting longer and longer...up to nine years in some regions of Wisconsin.  In today’s Wildlife Matters, DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz weighs his options heading into his first bear hunting season.  

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