Renee Montagne

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: We are joined now in the studio by NPR religion correspondent Tom Gjelten. We’re going to dive deeper into the address by Pope Francis to a joint meeting of Congress, an historic speech, the first for a pontiff to both houses. And it hit on a number of notes that are probably ringing loudly in the ears of U.S. politicians, notably, a call for vigilance against intolerance and fundamentalism. Welcome,...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Pope Francis received a welcome on Capitol Hill this morning that would usually be reserved for the president. Ladies and gentlemen, the pope of the Holy Sea were the words that were spoken, and the Pope went ahead and spoke before a joint meeting of Congress. He is, of course, the leader of the Catholic Church, a major figure in the world. He stressed the need for politicians to work together to solve...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Outside the gates of the White House, thousands of people are gathered, eager to get a glimpse of Pope Francis. The pope finished speaking minutes ago to about 15,000 people lucky enough to be inside for a ceremony on the South Lawn. President Obama acknowledged the crowd in his welcome to the pope. (SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH) BARACK OBAMA: I should explain that our backyard is not typically this crowded. ...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: The pope arrives here in Washington, D.C., tomorrow evening. He'll be greeted by the President and Mrs. Obama for the start of two days of firsts for the nation's capital. Pope Francis will perform the first canonization ceremony on American soil, and he will be the first pope to address a joint meeting of Congress. That speech comes at what could be a tricky time for the pontiff politically with a...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: And the winner is... (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) UNIDENTIFIED MAN: The International Olympic Committee has the honor to announce the host city of the Olympic Winter Games 2022 - Beijing. (APPLAUSE) MONTAGNE: Yes, Beijing, host of the 2008 summer games will now get the honors for the 2022 Winter Olympics as well, the first city to ever host both summer and winter games. NPR's Anthony Kuhn is in...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: For the first time since being elected president, Barack Obama visits Kenya tomorrow. The trip is getting a lot of attention because, of course, Kenya is the birthplace of the president's father. To better understand this East African nation, our colleague Renee Montagne turned to a Kenyan author, Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor. Her critically acclaimed debut novel, "Dust," is about Kenya's violent birth as a...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: In the many months that Iran, the U.S., and five other world powers met to negotiate a nuclear deal, ministers and diplomats were filmed and photographed at the negotiating table, sightseeing, waving from hotel balconies. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: That was the public face of the talks. Well away from the spotlight, and just as key, was the work of Ambassador William Burns. He's one of America's most senior...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: U.S. and Iranian officials are praising the nuclear agreement made in Vienna this morning. It's aimed, as we've said, at limiting Iran's ability to build nuclear weapons in exchange for lifting economic sanctions. President Hassan Rouhani said his people had been praying for a deal and, quote, "their prayers have been answered." It's fair to say, though, that no one was praying for this deal in much...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: News from the Supreme Court justices this morning. They have had a decision on the Affordable Care Act, often called Obamacare. The case was about who was allowed to get subsidies to buy health coverage. Effectively, though, the justices have upheld the law. Joining us now is NPR's national political correspondent, Mara Liasson, and NPR's Scott Horsley. Good morning. MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Good morning...

On the shores of California one recent morning, female Marines were heaving heavy chains to secure amphibious assault vehicles that soon would roll into the waves. The exercise was one part of a yearlong experiment aimed at settling the question of whether women can handle the punishing world of ground combat. Told by the Pentagon that it must open combat roles for women by 2016 — unless it can show a good reason not to — the Marine Corps has partnered with the University of Pittsburgh to...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. China's social media is obsessed with a new Photoshopping opportunity - covering cleavage from Venus de Milo to Scarlett Johansson. This after the country's popular drama "The Empress Of China" was yanked from the airwaves briefly so sensors could cover up the low-cut bodices of the characters. The deeply cut gowns were apparently authentic to fashions of the seventh...

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Herat is one of the most graceful cities in Afghanistan. Its traditions go back to the Persian empire, with its exquisite blue and green glass, and its thriving poetry scene. Now Herat is struggling with a darker side: drug addiction at a higher rate than almost anywhere else in the country. In a dusty ravine on the outskirts of the city, Ahmad, a scruffy 20-year-old, is striking a match to inhale heroin. It's a simple act he repeats throughout his day — heating a dark slab of heroin paste...

Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: And I'm Renee Montagne. The Supreme Court this morning, upheld a ban on using racial preferences in admissions to the public universities of Michigan. The ban was enacted by referendum as an amendment to the state constitution in 2006 and struck down by a lower court. Today, the justices voted 6-to-2 to say the federal courts could not do that and the ban had to stand. NPR's Nina...

On Saturday, voters turned out in large numbers despite threats of Taliban violence. It will take weeks to learn who will become Afghanistan's next president. Hamid Karzai can't run for a third term

Pages