Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts the program with Renee Montagne and David Greene.

Known for probing questions to everyone from presidents to warlords to musicians, Inskeep has a passion for stories of the less famous—like an American soldier who lost both feet in Afghanistan, or an Ethiopian woman's extraordinary journey to the United States.

Since joining Morning Edition in 2004, Inskeep has hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, Karachi, Cairo, Houston and Tehran; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a 2006 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award for "The Price of African Oil," on conflict in Nigeria. In 2012 he traveled 2,700 miles across North Africa in the wake of the Arab Spring. In 2013 he reported from war-torn Syria, and on Iran's historic election. In 2014 he drove with colleagues 2,428 miles along the entire U.S.-Mexico border; the resulting radio series, "Borderland," won widespread attention, as did the acclaimed NPR online magazine of the same name.

Inskeep says Morning Edition works to "slow down the news," making sense of fast-moving events. A prime example came during the 2008 Presidential campaign, when Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris conducted "The York Project," groundbreaking conversations about race, which received an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence.

Inskeep was hired by NPR in 1996. His first full-time assignment was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush. After the September 11, 2001, attacks, he covered the war in Afghanistan, turmoil in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid gone wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of NPR News teams awarded the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for coverage of Iraq.

On days of bad news, Inskeep is inspired by the Langston Hughes book, Laughing to Keep From Crying. Of hosting Morning Edition during the 2008 financial crisis and Great Recession, he told Nuvo magazine when "the whole world seemed to be falling apart, it was especially important for me ... to be amused, even if I had to be cynically amused, about the things that were going wrong. Laughter is a sign that you're not defeated."

Inskeep is the author of Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi, a 2011 book on one of the world's great megacities. He is also author of Jacksonland, a forthcoming history of President Andrew Jackson's long-running conflict with John Ross, a Cherokee chief who resisted the removal of Indians from the eastern United States in the 1830's.

He has been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, NBC's Meet the Press, MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports, CNN's Inside Politics and the PBS Newhour. He has written for publications including The New York Times, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he is deciding whether to sign legislation that would allow therapists to refuse service based on religious objections. In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, he said he is "talking to a lot of folks to get some input" on the bill and that he had boiled his thinking down to this central question: whether therapists could truly leave their values out of their work. On one hand, he points out that the American Counseling Association "says you...

Just how far could Republicans go to deny Donald Trump the party's nomination? A delegate to this summer's convention in Cleveland asserts that the GOP gathering could do anything it wants. Curly Haugland, a GOP national committeeman from North Dakota, told Morning Editio n on Thursday of his interpretation of party rules. Not for the first time, Haugland declared that party rules do not bind any delegate to vote for any particular candidate. He argues that even delegates who are ...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Last summer, authorities in Turkey deported a man. His name was Ibrahim el Bakraoui. He was sent away to the Netherlands. Turkish authorities say they warned he was a suspected extremist fighter. DAVID REENE, HOST: For whatever reason, he was released. He ended up in Belgium, and el Bakraoui has now been identified as one of this week's suicide bombers in Brussels. These emerging details underlie the complexity...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: You, too, can step into a nightmare world. Fans of "The Walking Dead" have been doing it. TV show sets and tractor-trailers are traveling around, currently in Salt Lake City. For 60 bucks, you can plunge into a world where you're fending off zombies, or you can be made up as a blood-covered walker yourself. It's the creation of the TV show's production company as well as a fan organization called Walker Stalker...

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, after some delay, has named a few of his foreign policy advisers. One says he hopes that if Trump is elected, cooler heads will persuade him not to carry through on some of his promises. Walid Phares is a writer, Fox News commentator and onetime national security adviser to 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Although scores of GOP foreign policy specialists wrote an open letter denouncing various Trump views as "unmoored in principle," "a...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A real politician used the slogan of a fictional president. Julia Louis-Dreyfus' character in "Veep" runs on the slogan, continuity with change. The writer tells The Guardian it's a hollow and oxymoronic phrase, which Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is now using. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) PRIME MINISTER MALCOLM TURNBULL: You have continuity, and you...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. President Obama traveled to Cuba on Air Force One. You can travel to Cuba on a cruise ship. Carnival says it's getting approval to send ships to the island. Although, there is a catch. These are designated as cultural exchange trips, which apparently means you cannot spend your time at some onboard casino. Your job is to spend at least eight hours per day on some...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: And Republican Congressman Dave Schweikert of Arizona is in our studios here in Washington. Once again, congressman, good morning. DAVID SCHWEIKERT: Good morning. INSKEEP: What do you think of what you've just heard? SCHWEIKERT: A, heartbreaking - B, we're going to have to have a honest conversation of rethinking the threat levels from a lone wolf because... INSKEEP: This isn't a lone wolf. That's what...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. Romania got a moment of fame. Rap star Snoop Dogg was in Bogota, Colombia and mistakenly entered his location on social media as Bogota, Romania, which caused excitement. The tiny town's mayor invited him for cabbage stew. Our friends at Vice sent a reporter to check out the town, finding scenic views and people growing hemp. Snoop Dogg later said he Steve Harveyed (ph)...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Let's listen to the election as it looks to one Florida voter. Michael Gonzales (ph) stepped out of a polling place yesterday in West Tampa. He's a Cuban-American with his values on display. He wore an I Voted sticker and a silver cross on a chain and a Tampa Bay Buccaneers T-shirt. He cast his vote yesterday for Democrat Hillary Clinton. MICHAEL GONZALES: Clinton, only in hopes that she names her...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Another round of presidential primaries has intensified the pressure on Republicans hoping to defeat Donald Trump. He won three primaries last night, including the big state of Michigan. DAVID GREENE, HOST: Ted Cruz won a single state - Idaho. John Kasich won nowhere but had a strong showing in Michigan. INSKEEP: Marco Rubio had one of his worst nights yet. He finished nowhere better than third and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: The United States is not the only country holding an election. Iran is choosing a Parliament today, which is big deal because Iran is deciding after a nuclear agreement how much, if at all, the country will change. Just how Iran runs an election says a lot about its version of democracy. Not everybody is allowed to run, and we have the story of a candidate who was refused. In Iran recently, we visited...

Why would Iranians visit their country's most spectacular ancient sites and come away disappointed? We talked with 10 Iranian visitors to Persepolis, the ruins of an ancient Persian capital, and found a collective sense of unease — less with the ruins themselves than with what they imply about the world around them. Consider a young woman who took a selfie amid the stones. "This is so beautiful," she said as she stood near 2,500-year-old limestone columns. She'd come with her husband on...

Iran has eagerly opened its doors to foreign investment now that a nuclear deal has cleared the way. So why is Iran still holding prisoner an Iranian-American businessman? This is one of the contradictions of the moment in Iran, where economic sanctions were lifted weeks ago. During seven days in the country, producer Emily Ochsenschlager and I found ourselves sitting next to British and German businessmen at hotel breakfast buffets. We met a builder eager for foreign investment to finish the...

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