Morning Edition on WXPR

Weekdays 4-9 AM

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.  Morning Edition - a world of ideas tailored to fit your busy life.

 

Genre: 

Pages

Crime In The City
2:26 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Hardcore With A Heart: Joburg Thrillers Star A Spunky P.I.

Jassy Mackenzie was born in Rhodesia and moved to South Africa when she was eight years old. She edits and writes for the annual publication Best of South Africa.
Soho Crime

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 3:45 am

South Africa's commercial capital, Johannesburg, is a mixture of the old Wild West and a complex, modern African hub — at least, that's how crime novelist Jassy Mackenzie describes it. Mackenzie was born across the border, in Zimbabwe, but she moved to Johannesburg — Joburg for short — as a child, and she's a passionate champion of the city.

"I love the energy of Johannesburg," Mackenzie says. "People are open. People communicate. People are friendly in a brash, big-city way, which I love. ... [it's] the New York of South Africa!"

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:24 am
Mon September 2, 2013

To Keep Polio At Bay, Israel Revaccinates A Million Kids

In early August, Israel launched a mass campaign to vaccinate children against polio, including this little girl at a clinic in Rahat.
David Buimovitch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 9:10 am

Israel is in the midst of a massive, emergency immunization drive of all children under the age of 9 against polio.

Why?

Health workers detected the virus in southern Israel in February. Since then, they've found it in 85 different sewage samples across the country, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative said Wednesday. Yet so far, no children have gotten sick or been paralyzed by the virus.

Read more
U.S.
2:23 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Cincinnati's Airport: Best In The U.S.?

A passenger rides an escalator to Terminal A at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in Erlanger, Ky.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 3:45 am

In the grand days of railroad travel, passengers arrived in monumental terminals. There was grandeur, style and comfort — qualities that today's equivalent for long-distance travel, the airport, mostly lack. Especially in the United States.

In a survey of international travelers by the British firm Skytrax, not a single U.S. airport ranked anywhere near the top of the list. Singapore got top honors, while the best the United States could do was Cincinnati's airport — which came in at No. 30.

Read more
Planet Money
2:21 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Ecuador To World: Pay Up To Save The Rainforest. World To Ecuador: Meh.

An aerial view of the Yasuni National Park, in Ecuador's northeastern jungle.
Dolores Ochoa AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 6:04 pm

The government of Ecuador has abandoned a plan that would have kept part of the Amazonian rainforest off limits to oil drilling. The initiative was an unusual one: Ecuador was promising to keep the oil in the ground, but it wanted to be paid for doing so.

Read more
Arts & Life
8:19 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Seamus Heaney, Irish Poet And Nobel Laureate, Dies At 74

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 8:51 am

Irish poet Seamus Heaney has died in Dublin at the age of 74. He was one of the world's best-known poets. In 1995 he won the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Around the Nation
6:10 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Kittens Force Partial Closure Of NYC Subway

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 8:51 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Big, bad New York City abruptly shut down two subway lines in Brooklyn yesterday when transit workers saw two tiny kittens on the track. Supervisors and transit police joined the pursuit of the little guys. Commuters kibitzed from the platforms. But it still took almost two hours of cat herding to catch the kitties and clear the tracks. Kittens safe, the commute resumed. More mews later. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:08 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Have A Red Carpet Moment Whenever You Want

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 8:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

If you haven't had enough of last weekend's Video Music Awards, you can take a little of it home with you. A Brooklyn store owner is auctioning off a strip of the long red carpet that was laid in front of his Mini Mart near the event. Yes, Miley Cyrus walked down it before her big performance. Starting bid for the chunk of carpet: 500 bucks. The seller said if no one bites, he'll put it in his basement. If he's a "Big Lebowski" fan, he knows it'll really tie the room together.

Middle East
3:46 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Iran Warns Against U.S. Military Strikes On Syria

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 7:34 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Read more
Sports
3:46 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Concussion Suits: NFL, Retirees Reach $765 Million Deal

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 8:51 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

A dark cloud hanging over the National Football League is a bit lighter today. There is a proposed settlement in a huge concussion lawsuit, brought by over 4,000 former players. The agreement was reached and announced yesterday, a week before the start of the new NFL season. If approved, the league will pay out $765 million to as many as 18,000 former players. NPR's Tom Goldman reports.

Read more
NPR Story
3:37 am
Fri August 30, 2013

If The U.S. Strikes, What Are The Targets Inside Syria?

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 8:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, one of the people urging President Obama to act on intelligence findings and strike against Syrian president Bashar al-Assad is retired General Jack Keane. He served in an advisory role in the U.S. occupation of Iraq, and he's now chairman of the board of the Institute for the Study of War. Keane says he has not been involved in the most recent talks about Syria, but he has a long history of military planning at the highest levels, and he gave us a window into the planning that's going on now.

Read more

Pages