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Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.  Morning Edition - a world of ideas tailored to fit your busy life.

 

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Media
3:21 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Readers Lament 'International Herald Tribune' Name Change

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The International Herald Tribune is about to change its name. In these difficult days for print journalism, fans of the Paris-based English newspaper are grateful that it's still being published. But the change is prompting a good bit of nostalgia.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley in Paris explains why.

(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTSTEPS)

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Planet Money
3:21 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Prize In Economics A Latecomer To Nobel Lineup

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Later this morning, the winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics will be announced in Sweden. Unlike some other Nobel Prizes we've heard about in recent days, this one comes with an asterisk. And NPR's Robert Smith is covering the story. He's in New York. Hi, Robert.

ROBERT SMITH, BYLINE: Hey, it's good to be here.

INSKEEP: Why is there an asterisk over the Nobel Prize in Economics?

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Politics
2:23 am
Mon October 14, 2013

How The Debt Limit Became 'A Nuclear-Tipped Leverage Point'

Congress set a limit on how much debt the U.S. Treasury could accrue back in 1917.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 5:14 pm

Political battles over the debt limit have been around nearly as long as the law passed by Congress in 1917 that set a statutory limit for how much debt the Treasury could accrue.

Since then, Congress has had to increase that limit on more than 100 occasions — and 40 of those times, lawmakers have tried to tie strings to raising the debt ceiling. In the last few years, though, there's been a marked escalation in those demands.

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Shots - Health News
2:22 am
Mon October 14, 2013

So What's The Real Deadline For Obamacare Sign-Up?

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 12:06 pm

The health exchanges are now open, though some have a lot of glitches. You still have lots of questions about how the Affordable Care Act affects you and your family.

And we have answers. In our ongoing series, we're addressing questions you've asked about the sign-up process.

With people having so much trouble logging onto the websites to get coverage, some are wondering how soon they have to sign up for coverage to avoid the potential penalties.

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Parallels
2:21 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Iran's Leaders Send Sobering Message: No Quick Economic Fix

Two Iranian textile merchants wait for customers in Tehran's main bazaar. President Hassan Rouhani has raised hopes by reaching out to the West and promising to work for an end to sanctions. But his team has cautioned that the country's economic problems have deep roots.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 3:21 am

The U.S. and its Western allies have not been able to win the nuclear concessions they have sought from Iran. But they have been able to inflict considerable economic pain through sanctions.

But now, Iran's call for a nuclear agreement and an end to sanctions has raised hopes among Iranians that better economic times may be ahead. The Iranian currency has stabilized somewhat since the election of President Hassan Rouhani, although inflation and unemployment remain high.

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Shots - Health News
10:03 am
Fri October 11, 2013

California Trains Helpers To Meet Demand For Health Insurance

Edward Avalos, one of the first certified enrollment specialists in California, is a very busy man.
Sarah Varney Kaiser Health News

Luisa Blue, head of the local Service Employees International Union in San Jose, Calif., has five more months to spend $1 million. The union received a grant from Covered California, the state's health insurance marketplace, to educate the public about the exchange.

SEIU is using some of the money to call people in their homes at night and on the weekend. "Over 4,000 (people) have said tell me more about Covered California and how can I enroll to get health insurance," Blue says of the union's first two weeks on the case.

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Religion
6:13 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Vatican Recalls Pope Medallions Because Of Typo

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 10:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. To commemorate the new pope, the Vatican minted thousands of medallions in gold, silver and bronze. A portrait of Francis was on one side and on the other, the Latin phrase that inspired Pope Francis to join the Jesuit order and become a priest. The medals went on sale this week and were promptly recalled after the Vatican discovered a typo: Jesus was misspelled as Lesus, with an L. One wit tweeted: I blame the Lesuits. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:06 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Your Chance To Lash Out At Congress

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 10:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with a chance to say what you think. Amid the federal shutdown, a website called DrunkDialCongress.org offers an outlet for frustration. You enter your phone number and get a call with a message.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: When I drink I like to tell people what's on my mind. So in a minute, we're going to forward you to a member of the House of Representatives.

INSKEEP: You're connected to the office of a randomly chosen member of Congress, though you must supply alcohol yourself.

Around the Nation
5:48 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Denver Mayor To Propose Outlawing Free Marijuana

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 10:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now we have an update this morning on Colorado's legalization of marijuana. This week we told you opponents of a proposed marijuana tax have been handing out free joints at rallies in Colorado. An ethics group is insisting the pot must disclosed as a campaign contribution. And now the mayor of Denver wants to act. Mayor Michael Hancock tells our friends at Colorado Public Radio he's proposing to outlaw handouts of free weed in city parks.

Movie Reviews
3:02 am
Fri October 11, 2013

'Captain Phillips' Review And Why Boston's Accent Isn't Easy

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 10:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Back in 2009, you may recall, Somali pirates boarded the cargo ship Alabama. The tension between the pirates and the American captain, Richard Phillips, is the basis for a new film in theaters this weekend, and critic Kenneth Turan has our review.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

KENNETH TURAN, BYLINE: The cargo ship Alabama is headed down the east coast of Africa when Captain Richard Phillips, played by Tom Hanks, sees something no captain in these waters wants to see.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "CAPTAIN PHILLIPS")

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