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Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.  Morning Edition - a world of ideas tailored to fit your busy life.

 

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Around the Nation
2:23 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Calif. Seeks Answers On Questionable Prison Sterilizations

Lawmakers in California have called for an internal audit after an investigation revealed that women were receiving sterilization procedures improperly at several state prisons, including the Valley State Prison for Women, pictured here in 2000.
Gary Kazanjian AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 8:04 am

Sitting in her San Francisco living room, Kimberly Jeffrey is combing her son Noel's hair. He groans, but she meets his energy with calm — and adoration.

Noel's birth was not an easy time. While Jeffrey was pregnant, she served a six-month sentence for petty theft at a state prison. When it came time to deliver Noel through a caesarean-section, Jeffrey was also confronted with the prospect of sterilization.

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The Salt
2:22 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Diet Of Defeat: Why Football Fans Mourn With High-Fat Food

Football fans ate fattier meals the day after their teams lost a game, a study found.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 4:35 pm

Backing a losing NFL team isn't just bad for your pride.

It's bad for your waistline.

A study that links sports outcomes with the eating behavior of fans finds that backers of NFL teams eat more food and fattier food the day after a loss. Backers of winning teams, by contrast, eat lighter food, and in moderation.

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Environment
11:08 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

EPA Wants To Limit Greenhouse Gases From New Coal Power Plants

Mississippi Power's Kemper County energy facility near DeKalb, Miss., seen under construction last year. Carbon dioxide will be captured from this plant and used to stimulate production of oil from existing wells.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 7:11 pm

The Environmental Protection Agency's second stab at a proposal to set the first-ever limits on greenhouse gas emissions from new power plants would make it impossible for companies to build the kind of coal-fired plants that have been the country's biggest source of electricity for decades.

Under the proposal, released Friday, any new plant that runs on coal would be permitted to emit only about half as much carbon dioxide as an average coal plant puts into the air today.

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The Two-Way
8:44 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Whale Of A Fine: JPMorgan Chase To Pay $920M In Penalties

The JPMorgan Chase building in London, where traders ran up huge losses.
Timur Emek AP

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 10:39 am

JPMorgan Chase has agreed to acknowledge that it violated federal securities laws and will pay $920 million in penalties assessed by regulators in the U.S. and U.K. to settle charges related to the huge trading losses racked up by its London traders last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced Thursday morning.

As we wrote earlier this week when word of the pending settlement first emerged, this all:

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Europe
5:13 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Exhibit In Scotland Showcases Miniature Books

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. There's a teensy tiny exhibit at the National Library of Scotland showcasing miniature books. One of the world's smallest is a version of the nursery rhyme "Old King Cole" no bigger than a grain of rice. Back in the 1800s, one Scottish publisher discovered that a poorly selling copy of poems by Robert Burns became a bestseller when he miniaturized it, starting a tradition there of wee little tomes, not so much read as collected. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:07 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Jail In Yonkers, N.Y., Is Put On The Real Estate Market

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

The key to the real estate is location, location, location. In this case, the location is a jail. Authorities in Yonkers, New York put a lockup on the market. They're asking two-a-half-million dollars for a building that may need renovation, but does have a Hudson River view. Rent laws can make it hard for the buyers of a building to evict the old tenants, but not in this case. We're told the inmates will be moved out on Sunday.

Europe
2:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

France Moves To Ban Kids Under 16 From Beauty Pageants

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The French Senate voted to ban beauty pageants for children under 16. The measure is part of a larger bill on women's rights.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that lawmakers see this move as a way to protect the young from being sexualized.

(SOUNDBITE OF A DOCUMENT)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (French spoken)

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Analysis
2:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Feds Say NYC Building Is A Front For Iran

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the last few days we've learned that Iran has released political prisoners and that its new president and President Obama have written each other. Also suggesting a thaw in the relationship, both leaders expressed a desire to resolve their countries' dispute over Iran's nuclear program. These seeming overtures come as President Hassan Rouhani prepares to fly to New York to address the U.N.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Analysis
2:59 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Census Bureau Survey Indicates How Americans Live

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep with some new information about us. The Census Bureau conducts the American Community Survey every year. It's an annual snapshot of who Americans are and how we live, and it's kind of like Christmas morning for demographers such as William Frey of the Brookings Institution. We asked him what trends he sees this year.

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Shots - Health News
2:20 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Employers Trim Health Costs By Cutting Coverage For Spouses

Workers prepare orders to be loaded for shipment at a UPS Healthcare Supply Chain and Distribution Center in Atlanta on March 12. The company recently announced that it would no longer offer coverage for spouses who had their own job-based insurance.
Robin Nelson Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 9:05 am

When UPS told workers that it would no longer offer health coverage for spouses who had their own job-based insurance, it caused a big stir. But the shipping giant has plenty of company.

So many employers are trying to cut back on health coverage for spouses that it has become a trend. The practice began well before the Affordable Care Act passed, and the connection to the law, in some cases, isn't that direct.

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