Tim Kratz

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

The Trout Lake Research Station is inviting the public to step inside a limnologist’s world for an afternoon.

It’s holding an open house this Friday.

Trout Lake Station Director Tim Kratz says the research that scientists do at the station is relevant to a lot of people in the Northwoods.

“And one of the things we want to do is to help communicate some of the results that we’ve found. but also to hear from the community and visitors about what their concerns about lakes are, or what questions they might have.”

The popular science conversation series Science on Tap takes a different approach this week in tackling a controversial topic.  Instead of hosting one speaker at a brewpub, it’s assembled a panel at a large venue to discuss the proposed iron mine in the Penokee Hills. 

Organizer Tim Kratz says since the program began, people have been asking for a program about the Penokee Mine. 

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Many people come to the Northwoods to get away from the rest of the world.  

But at the University of Wisconsin Limnology Research Station at Trout Lake, scientists are trying to do just the opposite.  

Since 2004 Director Tim Kratz has been one of the pioneers putting together a network of limnologists, or scientists studying lakes, around the world.  It’s called GLEON, the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network.  WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski sat down with Kratz to talk about how GLEON is part of a changing way of doing science.