aquatic invasive species

A near perfect growing season has made gardeners happy, but it also means a large growth of aquatic invasive species in our lakes.

Oneida County AIS coordinator Michele Sadauskas  says they've noticed abundant weed growth this summer  and more vegetation being hauled up onto landings...

" the same time we're getting some feedback from the wardens that people aren't paying a lot of attention what is coming off their boats and they're leaving some of that vegetation on the boats..."

The first Oneida County Clean Boats-Clean Waters workshop is Wednesday afternoon to help volunteers working boat landings this year some preparation.

Volunteers go to boat landings to work with boaters about not spreading aquatic invasive species from lake to lake.

Oneida County AIS coordinator Michele Sadauskas says with the fishing opener this weekend, it's a good time to update volunteers...

A provision of the state budget bill would eliminate a program that a local invasive species coordinator says helped them fight water invasives here in the north.

The Wisconsin Environmental Education Board helped get grants to Oneida county's A.I.S. program says Coordinator Michele Sadauskas. She says one grant enabled the program to hire a person to contact ice anglers...

"....they were able to talk to just over a thousand people...and we were able to gather a lot of data that we normally would not have during the winter time. So (WEEB) really helped us..."

Submitted photo

It’s been over a year since monitors found Wisconsin’s first inland lake invasion of a plant called yellow floating heart in Forest County. The latest inspection did not reveal any new plants. 

It’s chilly grey day in late October, and it’s the last time this year that Forest County Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator John Preuss will check for yellow floating heart. 

“What I look for is the shape of the leaf.  And when it’s flowering…and the seed pods are kind of tear dropped shape.” 

Stefan Czapski /

Volunteers in the Northwoods will be visiting bridges this Saturday…and taking an inventory of aquatic invasives they find.

Oneida County Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator Michele Sadauskus says they’ll canvass several areas to get a count of what species are present at different bridges.

“We’re hoping not to find anything new.  A lot of these areas don’t have a lot of information or data collected on them.  So we’re going into a lot of these areas with a fresh look at them.” 

Vilas County Land and Water Conservation

A meeting later this month will celebrate 10 years of Northwoods efforts to fight aquatic invasive species, but a spokesperson says the gathering will also look at challenges for the next decade.

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

As many property owners and lake groups know, Eurasian water milfoil is a problem without a great solution.  It’s an invasive plant that grows in dense mats in lakes throughout Wisconsin.  It can be treated with chemicals to keep the growth down, but that comes with side effects as well as a hefty price tag.  But some researchers think there could be a way to use tiny bugs called milfoil weevils as a biocontrol on some lakes.  But the idea is more complicated than it seems. 

A meeting has been called Saturday morning in Rhinelander to hear the results of studies on a growing population of terrestrial and aquatic invasive species in the Wisconsin River near Rhinelander.

Called the Rhinelander Flowage, it's the area north of the Philip St. dam by Expera Paper north to McNaughton, including several large bodies of water including Boom Lake.

Scott Eshelman is an organizer of the meeting.....

Anglers will be seeing volunteers and DNR staff out at boat landings this weekend  hoping to put something cold in the live wells.
Oneida County Aquatic Invasive species coordinator Michele Sadauskas says to help slow the spread of aquatic invasive hitchhikers, volunteers will be handing out ice packs to put in live wells...

"...instead of transporting fish, live in water in the live wells, we're handing out ice packs to help them drain their live wells and put their catch on ice...."

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Kids at Rhinelander schools celebrated winning awards in an aquatic invasive species poster contest Wednesday.  The contest spans nine Northwoods counties…and asks kids to design a poster and slogan that spreads awareness of aquatic invasives.  

Central Intermediate School fourth grade students Reagan Hartman and Elise Tesch took first and second place in their division. 

“Well I drew a boat…and I wrote stop and pick off invasive species," Hartman explained.