aquatic invasive species

Prohibited Species in Wisconsin
4:07 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

Lake Gordon Clear of Yellow Floating Heart

It’s been over a year since monitors found Wisconsin’s first inland lake invasion of a plant called yellow floating heart in Forest County. The latest inspection did not reveal any new plants. 

It’s chilly grey day in late October, and it’s the last time this year that Forest County Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator John Preuss will check for yellow floating heart. 

“What I look for is the shape of the leaf.  And when it’s flowering…and the seed pods are kind of tear dropped shape.” 

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Inventory of Invasives
4:11 pm
Wed September 10, 2014

Monitors Look to Bridges as Potential Aquatic Invasive Hotspots

Purple loosestrife and other invasive species are the targets of a survey of bridges this weekend.
Credit Stefan Czapski / http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2559210

Volunteers in the Northwoods will be visiting bridges this Saturday…and taking an inventory of aquatic invasives they find.

Oneida County Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator Michele Sadauskus says they’ll canvass several areas to get a count of what species are present at different bridges.

“We’re hoping not to find anything new.  A lot of these areas don’t have a lot of information or data collected on them.  So we’re going into a lot of these areas with a fresh look at them.” 

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Meeting Sept. 25
5:38 am
Mon September 1, 2014

10 Years Of Fighting Aquatic Invasive Species--What's Next?

Ted Ritter
Credit Vilas County Land and Water Conservation

A meeting later this month will celebrate 10 years of Northwoods efforts to fight aquatic invasive species, but a spokesperson says the gathering will also look at challenges for the next decade.

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Natural Resources
4:00 am
Tue August 26, 2014

Raising Bigger, Stronger Weevils for a Better Tomorrow

Researcher Amy Thorstenson hopes lake groups will be able to raise weevils and use them as a biocontrol for Eurasian water milfoil.
Credit Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

As many property owners and lake groups know, Eurasian water milfoil is a problem without a great solution.  It’s an invasive plant that grows in dense mats in lakes throughout Wisconsin.  It can be treated with chemicals to keep the growth down, but that comes with side effects as well as a hefty price tag.  But some researchers think there could be a way to use tiny bugs called milfoil weevils as a biocontrol on some lakes.  But the idea is more complicated than it seems. 

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Boom Lake boat landing
9:43 pm
Tue August 12, 2014

Rhinelander Flowage Invasives Topic Of Meeting Saturday

A meeting has been called Saturday morning in Rhinelander to hear the results of studies on a growing population of terrestrial and aquatic invasive species in the Wisconsin River near Rhinelander.

Called the Rhinelander Flowage, it's the area north of the Philip St. dam by Expera Paper north to McNaughton, including several large bodies of water including Boom Lake.

Scott Eshelman is an organizer of the meeting.....

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Slow AIS spread
3:11 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Ice Packs To Replace Water In OC Live Wells

Credit commons.wikipedia.org

Anglers will be seeing volunteers and DNR staff out at boat landings this weekend  hoping to put something cold in the live wells.
Oneida County Aquatic Invasive species coordinator Michele Sadauskas says to help slow the spread of aquatic invasive hitchhikers, volunteers will be handing out ice packs to put in live wells...

"...instead of transporting fish, live in water in the live wells, we're handing out ice packs to help them drain their live wells and put their catch on ice...."

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Educating Kids About Invasives
3:00 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

AIS Poster Contest Spreads Awareness, Not Species

Elise Tesch (left) and Reagan Hartman won second and first place in the 4th/5th grade poster contest division.
Credit Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Kids at Rhinelander schools celebrated winning awards in an aquatic invasive species poster contest Wednesday.  The contest spans nine Northwoods counties…and asks kids to design a poster and slogan that spreads awareness of aquatic invasives.  

Central Intermediate School fourth grade students Reagan Hartman and Elise Tesch took first and second place in their division. 

“Well I drew a boat…and I wrote stop and pick off invasive species," Hartman explained.

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Summer Approaches
10:00 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Boat Monitors Prepare To Defend Lakes Against Invasives

A training session demonstrates the difference between native and invasive species of milfoil.
Credit Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Our lakes may still be covered in ice, but volunteer lake monitors are gearing up for a season of keeping invasive species at bay. 

Dozens of volunteers gathered this week in Rhinelander for a refresher on rules and protocols.  Oneida County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator Michele Sadauskas says they’re a fraction of those working in Oneida County alone.

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Problem spreading west
12:08 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Invasive Phragmites Seen In Northwoods

Phragmites is present along the shores of Lake Michigan.
Credit en.wikipedia.org

Another invasive plant is threatening the shorelines of our northern waters...a plant that has taken over large stretches of Lake Michigan and Green Bay shores. 

It's called phragmites. Ken Krall spoke with Vilas County invasive species coordinator Ted Ritter about the threat from the tall plant that's very aggressive...

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Going Against the Grain
4:51 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Study Reveals Nuances of Aquatic Invasive Behavior

Invasive species like eurasian water milfoil can be a big problem.
Credit BerndH via Wikimedia Commons

We usually think of an invasive species as taking over its environment, at the expense its native counterparts.  

But a new study from the University of Wisconsin Madison’s Center for Limnology challenges that assumption.  It compiled survey data from a variety of studies on aquatic species, and finds that most of the time aquatic invasives keep a pretty low profile.  WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski sat down with Gretchen Hansen, lead author on the study.  

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