deer hunting

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Many northern Wisconsin counties could see zero-level quotas for antlerless deer for the second year in a row.

County deer advisory councils in Oneida, Vilas, Forest, Iron, and Langlade counties have made preliminary recommendations to give out zero permits for antlerless deer.

Vilas County Deer Advisory Council chair Ken Anderson says the council weighed the fact that even with restrictions…youth, disabled and active military hunters can still obtain an antlerless permit.

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County deer advisory councils will be meeting again this month to help determine antlerless deer quotas. 

DNR wildlife biologist Melinda Nelson says each council will recommend a specific number anterless tags.

“Looking at a variety of metrics including winter severity, 2014 deer harvest numbers and taking public input, and deciding how many antlerless tags they want out on the landscape.”

Nelson says the local management units will make initial recommendations, and then take feedback from the public. 

Michele Woodford / Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

County deer advisory councils will have more flexibility this year, if a permanent rule for changes to the state’s deer management plan goes forward.

Changes thanks to the Deer Trustee Report took effect last season temporarily, and the state Natural Resources Board must act to make them permanent.  

DNR Wildlife Regulation Policy specialist Scott Loomans says continuation of the plan will expand options for County Deer Advisory Councils. 

Michele Woodford / Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Oneida County’s Deer Advisory Council is asking for an increase in the deer herd for the next three years. 

The council met last week to finalize its first round of recommendations to the DNR.

As chair Ed Choinski explains, it will be a few months before the council sets specific recommendations for the number of antlerless permits. 

Michele Woodford / Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Hunters registered more than ten thousand bucks in the northern district during opening weekend.  That’s down by about 12 percent compared to last year according to the DNR’s preliminary figures.

DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz says part of the decline is likely due to last winter’s taking a toll on the herd. 

Michele Woodford / Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

As deer hunters know well, the archery season opens Saturday in Wisconsin.

It will be a unique deer hunting season with a set of new regulations in place, and buck-only hunts in most northern counties.

Deer hunters may face some adjustments when they head out into the woods this weekend. 

As DNR Warden Supervisor Dave Walz explains, a variety of changes are taking effect thanks to the deer trustee rule package.  For one, deer management units now tend to follow county lines, instead of highway or river boundaries like they often did before. 

Michele Woodford / Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

The DNR is proposing a buck-only hunt for most northern counties.  That’s in response to a harsh winter and high deer mortality.

DNR Big Game Ecologist Kevin Wallenfang says not hunting does will give the deer herd a chance to rebound.

wisconsin.gov

On the eve of the 2013 Wisconsin gun deer hunt, WXPR's Ken Krall talked with DNR Secretary Cathy Stepp, a new deer hunter herself, about the upcoming hunt.

Stepp says they are working to have a app ready for smartphones that relates to the hunt. More information is on the DNR website.

Rhinelander Daily News, November 19, 1942

Wisconsin’s gun deer season is approaching.  It’s a time when many hunters across the state look forward to getting away from the pressures of work, spending time in the woods.  

But as WXPR’s Bob Willging relates in today’s History Afield essay, the 1942 murder of a conservation warden in Florence County had deer hunters in northeast Wisconsin anything but relaxed.

In the autumn of 1942, America was becoming deeply involved in World War II.

dnr.wi.gov

  Saying he's the eyes and ears in this region for the state DNR Secretary, the Northern Region Director held office hours in Tomahawk. He says they will be doing more of this type of interaction with the public.

 

John Gozdzialski met with the public at Tomahawk city hall. He says city of Tomahawk officials talked about what they needed in upcoming projects, but also heard from other members of the public...

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