gardening

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Educators and gardeners from around the Northwoods gathered this week to talk about school gardens.  The conference happened at University of Stevens Point’s Natural Resources Education Center, Treehaven. 

For two days presenters shared tips on things like seed saving, mulching, and planning kid-friendly garden activities. 

Donelle Scaffidi organized the School Garden Symposium as part of her graduate work at UWSP.  She says it’s provided a chance to brainstorm solutions to common problems…like finding funding and how to manage school gardens over summer vacation. 

Rogersoh via http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rain_garden.jpg

As many people work to put in their gardens this time of year, DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz is gardening with particular goals in mind.  As part of his ongoing series Wildlife Matters, Holtz reflects on gardening for wildlife.  

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Temperatures are warming up and that means many people are eager to plant gardens.  

Spring is the busiest season of the year for Hanson’s Garden Village in Rhinelander.  Many of the greenhouses are bursting with flowers, herbs and vegetable starts that have been nurtured since March. 

Brent Hanson says it’s still too early to plant most things outside. 

Jack W. Pearce

It’s still the middle of winter - but for some gardeners it’s not too early to look ahead to spring.  

The Iron County Land and Water Conservation Department runs a program to promote native plants for gardens and yards.  The program includes a mid-winter sale, where gardeners can pre-order native varieties for pick-up in May or June.  WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski spoke to the department’s Heather Palmquist about the native plants program.  

Palmquist says native plants are well-suited for Northwoods growing conditions.