Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission

DNR May Restrict Anglers
2:46 pm
Thu March 20, 2014

Tribes Reserve More Walleye for Spearing

Chippewa tribal members spear walleye in springtime, when the fish swim into the shallows to spawn.
Credit Eric Engbretson / US Fish and Wildlife Service

The state Natural Resources Board has authorized the DNR to take emergency steps to protect Wisconsin’s fish supply.  The move comes after Wisconsin’s Chippewa tribes declared they’ll reserve a record number of walleye in the spearing season.

Wisconsin’s six Chippewa tribes plan to spear up to 63,000 walleye this spring - five thousand more than last year.  As Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission spokesperson Sue Erickson explains, typically tribal members only take about half of what is declared.  

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Preserving Culture and Getting Outdoors
4:00 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Snow Snakes: A Lesson in Survival

Snow snakes is a game using thin painted sticks, often made of ash or maple.
Credit Matthew Rethaber

A group of middle school students gathered last month in Lac du Flambeau to learn outdoor winter skills.  Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission organized the weekend camp.  As WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski reports, it’s as much about cultural preservation as it is getting outdoors. 

At Deep Snow Camp, most of the activities are focused on survival skills like building a snow shelter or ice fishing with simple materials.  But a lot of the sessions focus on another type of survival: the cultural kind. 

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A Tale of Two Mines
1:33 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

Mine Regulations: Not Tough Enough?

One mining specialist is questioning whether a proposed iron mine in the Penokee range has enough social support to go forward. 

John Coleman is an environmental section leader at Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, a group that helps enforce tribal treaty rights in Wisconsin.  Coleman has worked primarily on mining issues since 1994, when a mine proposed near Crandon faced tribal opposition.  

Coleman thinks state regulators aren’t as tough as they were in the nineties.

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