Henry Schienebeck

Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest

The Chequamegon Nicolet National Forest is working with partners to help carry out forest management projects, and that could be good news for the timber industry.

The forest products industry has complained that the national forest isn’t meeting its harvest goals, while the Forest Service says it doesn’t have enough funding to carry out all of its management projects. 

But Henry Schienebeck of Great Lakes Timber Professionals says collaborations have begun to help get work done on the forest. 

Steven Thomas / US Fish and Wildlife Service

A declining species of bat will be federally protected throughout its range.  But the US Fish and Wildlife’s decision to list the northern long-eared bat as threatened, is drawing criticism from wildlife advocates who wanted stronger protections. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has listed the northern long-eared bat as threatened due to the impacts of the deadly white nose syndrome.  But the agency withheld the more dire designation of endangered.  It’s also exempting activities like forest management from rules that prohibit incidental killing of the bat. 

Steven Thomas / US Fish and Wildlife Service

A decision over whether to list the northern long-eared bat as endangered is no more than a week away. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed the listing because bat populations face devastation from the deadly white-nose syndrome. 

But some farmers and loggers have argued the bat is still too numerous to warrant an endangered listing. 

Great Lakes Timber Professionals Director Henry Schienebeck says it would bring too many restrictions.

Steven Thomas / US Fish and Wildlife Service

Forest products industry leaders are voicing concern about a federal plan that could designate a bat species as endangered.  The listing could restrict summer logging. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is considering an endangered species listing for the northern long-eared bat, due to dramatic population declines and the spread of a deadly disease called white nose syndrome.  But protecting the species could cost the forest products industry.  

Federal guidelines to protect the bat discourage some types of summer logging.