invasive species

UW Arboretum

Another in a long line of invasive pests with Asian origins is likely coming to the Northwoods.

Oneida County invasive species specialist Jean Hansen says the Jumping Worm, a native of Japan and Korea threatens woods and fields and has been found or suspected in parts of Wisconsin. She says the DNR is trying to alert gardeners and property owners about the worm which looks a little like the common earthworm with a tan band around its torso..

vilas conservation.org

Vilas county's long-time Invasive Species Coordinator will be retiring next month and he says while progress has been made in fighting invasives, challenges remain.

Ted Ritter has been at the job for a little over 10 years. He says the majority of his job evolves around aquatic invasives. He says since 2004, the public knowledge of aquatic invasives has grown dramatically....

"...I'm happy to say after 10 years, public awareness of aquatic invasive species is now up through the roof and climbing...

commons.wikimedia.org

For the first time, the possibility of preventing invasive species from entering into Wisconsin has been approved. The Natural Resources Board voted to approve revisions to the state's invasive species rule known  as NR40. The revisions include listing of additional species and delisting of currently regulated species under the state's Invasive Species Identification, Classification and Control rule.

en.wikipedia.org

The state Natural Resources Board will decide Wednesday on revisions to the state's invasive species rule..
Vilas County's Invasive Species Coordinator Ted Ritter says the changes in both the land and water invasive rules have been talked about for a long time. Dozens of species are being categorized. Ritter says one plant has drawn attention....

USDA

The Emerald Ash Borer has been found in Rhinelander.  That makes Oneida County the 38th county in Wisconsin to go under quarantine for movement of firewood.

The state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection says the borer was found at James Williams Middle School, in a trap set by a USDA monitoring program. 

Spokesperson Donna Gilson says it appears the infestation was found early.

Colin Smith / Trout Lake Station

A new way of combating invasive smelt is meeting with mixed success – literally – at the end of a two-year study.  The Crystal Lake Mixing Project was able to get rid of most of the smelt in Crystal Lake…but not all of it.

The mixing project began two years ago at the University of Wisconsin Madison’s Trout Lake Station.  Its main goal was to stir up the layers of Crystal Lake, warming the bottom and making it inhospitable for cold-water-loving smelt, which were harming native populations of walleye and yellow perch.

Stefan Czapski / http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2559210

Three Lakes has completed a detailed survey of terrestrial invasive species in the town. 

The data was collected by one individual: Baerbel Ehrig walked and biked 260 miles in Three Lakes last year…on both sides of each and every town road. 

Ehrig explains the purpose is to better understand which invasives are present on a local level, and how many of them there are.  And roads are a good place to start. 

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Kids at Rhinelander schools celebrated winning awards in an aquatic invasive species poster contest Wednesday.  The contest spans nine Northwoods counties…and asks kids to design a poster and slogan that spreads awareness of aquatic invasives.  

Central Intermediate School fourth grade students Reagan Hartman and Elise Tesch took first and second place in their division. 

“Well I drew a boat…and I wrote stop and pick off invasive species," Hartman explained.

commons.wikimedia.org

Groups are meeting next month to try to stop the spread of invasive land plants in the Northwoods.

The Wisconsin Headwaters Invasive Partnership is hosting an open-to-the public meeting at Trees for Tomorrow in Eagle River.

Jack W. Pearce

It’s still the middle of winter - but for some gardeners it’s not too early to look ahead to spring.  

The Iron County Land and Water Conservation Department runs a program to promote native plants for gardens and yards.  The program includes a mid-winter sale, where gardeners can pre-order native varieties for pick-up in May or June.  WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski spoke to the department’s Heather Palmquist about the native plants program.  

Palmquist says native plants are well-suited for Northwoods growing conditions. 

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