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Three Spring Beauties

Apr 10, 2018
Contributed Photograph

In this episode of Field Notes, Susan Knight gives us three reasons to look forward to spring.

I am a huge fan of winter.  But once the snow is clearly on its way out, who doesn’t start thinking about spring?  And what says spring better than … skunk cabbage?

Kayla Breese/Northwoods River News

Have you ever felt like you’re talking to someone, but they just aren’t reading your body language?

The New York based dance company the Equus Projects will be performing “The Breaking Ring” at ArtStart in downtown Rhinelander this weekend and they’ve made a name for themselves by listening and responding to the way humans — and horses — move.

WXPR Public Radio

Its back to basics for the Masked Biologist this week, as he talks about the value and importance of continuing education and certification in this episode of Wildlife Matters.

Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

How much do you know about Wisconsin’s rabbits and hares?

In this week’s episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines the lagomorphs of Wisconsin.

Wikimedia Commons

Wildlife needs to adapt to its place on the globe to survive, not to mention thrive.

In this installment of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist takes a look at another generally accepted principle of adaptation to life in the north: Allen’s Rule.

Wikipedia Commons

The winter Olympics are going on now, not only in South Korea but also right here in Wisconsin’s Northwoods. In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist highlights the athletic river otter.

In this month’s episode of Field Notes, Susan Knight explains how a tiny relative of our mosquito holds the key to all that chocolate you plan to eat tomorrow on Valentine’s Day.

Valentine’s Day is coming up, and with it, a celebration of chocolate. Almost everyone loves chocolate, but you may not realize that the hero of the chocolate story is a tiny biting midge, a relative of our friends the mosquito and black fly.

Wikimedia Commons

Deep wintertime appears to be an advantageous time of year for some wildlife species to breed.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist takes a look at the breeding habits of Wisconsin’s CARNIVORA, or carnivorous furbearers.

Looking for a cure for cabin fever? In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist gives us some tips and tricks for viewing and documenting wildlife tracks and scat left in the snow.

While dealing with winter’s worst, we can always grab another blanket or turn up the thermostat to stay comfortable. Wildlife has to rely on finding other ways to try to stay warm.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about thermal cover.

Do you enjoy watching birds at a backyard feeder?

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about two backyard bird feeder surveys that take place every winter.

It is safe to say that we are experiencing a genuine Wisconsin winter right now—the snow, the cold temperatures, short days and seemingly endless nights.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines Bergmann’s rule, which helps explain how our wildlife can handle Northwoods winters.

Scott Bowe

In this month's installment of Field Notes Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses Lichens in Wisconsin’s forests, a fascinating organism commonly overlooked.

Bird feeding is the second most popular hobby in the United States (behind gardening), with more than 55 million Americans participating annually.

In this week's edition of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about how, and what, to feed our local and visiting bird species this winter.

Black bears are easily one of our most interesting wildlife species. In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist discusses some of what is going on in the life of a bear in the midst of Winter.

Black bears are a continual source of questions for folks who contact me for information. The calls tend to taper off somewhat in the winter, naturally, as bear activity slows to a crawl. However, any winter observation of a bear or a bear den gets a lot of attention and will trigger a number of calls.

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