Pelican Lake

Pelican Elementary School Receives $1500 LEAN Grant

Jun 1, 2015

Pelican Elementary School students and staff have a new opportunity for hands-on learning. They will be planting a school garden, thanks to a $1500 grant from LEAN—which stands for Linking Education, Activity, and Nutrition—and is a coalition through the Oneida County Health Department. The hope is that students and staff will able to harvest and taste-test their hard work this fall.

Pixabay

The state capitol will celebrate the holidays this year with help from a 40-foot balsam fir from Pelican Lake in Oneida County. 

Dennis Shoeneck is owner of logging company Enterprise Forest Products.  He’s donating the large tree for the statehouse rotunda, along with more than a dozen smaller trees for outside the Capitol Square and Governor’s residence.

Shoeneck describes how Madison officials came to check out the trees earlier this spring, and notified him of their selections. 

Mark Miller / http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pelican_Lake_Fishing_7-3-2009.jpg

The DNR has confirmed the presence of blue-­green algae located in Pelican Lake in eastern Oneida County.  The algae appears in late summer and can be a health hazard for humans and animals. Oneida County Registered Sanitarian Jody McKinney talked with Ken Krall about the problem. 

McKinney says seek immediate medical help from a doctor or veterinarian if people or pets are exposed to blue­green algae.

Hunters and trappers spend a great deal of time alone in the woods, and outdoor activities in remote areas have their share of inherent dangers.  

Those dangers were even more apparent in the 1930s, a time of limited communication, large tracts of remote country, few heavily traveled roads, and the occasional gangster, moonshiner or poacher.

In today’s History Afield, Bob Willging tells the story of one man’s mysterious death in the woods in 1931.