Poets on Poetry

A Rose for Shakespeare

Apr 29, 2014
Wikimedia Commons

If you’ve attended high school, chances are good that you’ve read at least one Shakespeare play—and perhaps some of his sonnets, too. 

Minocqua poet Andree Graveley has a special connection to the Bard’s poetry. A few years ago, she decided to pay homage to Shakespeare by bringing him a rose. As part of this month’s Poets on Poetry series, Graveley tells of the surprising coincidences that led her to the very feet of the poet himself.

Poets on Poetry: Revision

Apr 22, 2014
Jeff Eaton

April is National Poetry Month.  As part of our month-long series Poets on Poetry, Nicolet College Instructor Jeff Eaton reflects on the value of revision.

Writing “the best words in their best order,” according to Samuel Taylor Coleridge, defines poetry. Easily said, but not so easily achieved. Invention, the calling up of images, at some point must give over to revision – the “seeing again” that becomes the core work of composing poetry.

My Year in Haiku: Learning to Write Poetry Again

Apr 15, 2014
Seabamirum / https://flic.kr/p/dQawfu

Rhinelander poet Brent Goodman once vowed he’d never write a haiku.  So why has he been writing nothing but haiku for the past 10 months?  As part this month’s Poets on Poetry series, Goodman tells how it all began with a course by Haiku Master Lee Gurga.

It’s April again, which for me means participating in a daily challenge called “NaPoWriMo,” or National Poetry Writing Month. It’s an annual project in which poets attempt to write a poem a day for the entire month of April.

Emily Bright

When Emily Bright decided to get her Masters of Fine Arts degree in poetry, she expected that it would prepare her for a career of teaching and writing. What she didn’t expect was that being a poet would teach her how to be a good parent.  Today in the first of our series “Poets on Poetry,” Bright tells us the story.