Science on Tap

en.wikipedia.org

The  speaker Wednesday(5/6) for  'Science On Tap' in Minocqua will discuss the overuse of antibiotics and what possible options might be around the corner.

Dr. Warren Rose is an Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Pharmacy. He says there has been news stories about recent lack of  development of antibiotic agents....

"...we're reaching a point where you have the emergence of antibiotic resistance at a time when there is limited new products coming out. It leaves patients at a crux of a problem that there is no treatment for them..."

U.S Geological Survey via http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Great_Lakes_1913_Storm_Shipwrecks.png

Science on Tap this week is looking at water quality in the Great Lakes.

Director of UW Madison’s Aquatic Sciences Center Jim Hurley says the nature of Great Lakes pollution has changed over the years, now coming from more diffuse sources instead of point ones. 

“We might have mercury, that used to be discharged directly from industrial sources, where dilution was the solution.  And now we’ve pretty much eliminated most of those, but we find that mercury enters the lake based on rainfall, and from the atmosphere.”

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Two speakers coming to the Northwoods this week will discuss water relationships in northern Wisconsin. 

Emily Stanley from UW Madison’s Center for Limnology says the water resources here are intricately linked, and are really one resource. 

“Surface water today is ground water next year; and really trying to isolate one lake and how we think of it, and how it fits within the Northwoods – you really can’t view it in isolation, these systems really are a part of one big interactive system.” 

A dean from the University of Wisconsin Madison will visit the Northwoods Wednesday, to find out how her college can build more partnerships in the Northwoods.

Kate VandenBosch is Dean of the College of Life and Agricultural Sciences at UW Madison.  She’s the speaker at this month’s informal discussion series Science on Tap.

VandenBosch says it’s part of the university’s mission to reach all parts of the state.  And she says there are several initiatives already at work in rural communities in the Northwoods that focus on natural resources. 

Michele Woodford / Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

It’s no longer uncommon to see a bald eagle in the Northwoods. 

Oneida and Vilas counties have the highest number of pairs of bald eagles in Wisconsin, according to the most recent DNR survey in 2013.

After disappearing from most areas of the state in the mid-20th century, there are now more than 1300 pairs of eagles in Wisconsin. 

Ron Eckstein, a retired DNR Wildlife Biologist, worked on eagle conservation efforts for more than 25 years.  WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski spoke with Eckstein to hear more about bald eagle success story.

The popular science conversation series Science on Tap takes a different approach this week in tackling a controversial topic.  Instead of hosting one speaker at a brewpub, it’s assembled a panel at a large venue to discuss the proposed iron mine in the Penokee Hills. 

Organizer Tim Kratz says since the program began, people have been asking for a program about the Penokee Mine. 

NASA / https://flic.kr/p/jXLDrB

Maggie Turnbull lives in Antigo and works as a freelance astrobiologist.  

  It’s the study of the origin and future of life in the universe.  Turnbull has gained international recognition for her work cataloging star systems that could support life, and is now working with NASA on a telescope to better look at those systems.  WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski spoke with Turnbull over the phone.  

She says the problem is that stars give out so much light, it’s hard to even see the planets that orbit them. 

Dan Pancamo / http://www.flickr.com/photos/pancamo/5682217366/sizes/m/

Anna Pidgeon is an avian ecologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a guest at this week’s Science on Tap discussion.  

WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski spoke with Pidgeon about her research on how habitat loss and climate events may influence the range of some songbirds.

Vitamin D could help prevent osteoporosis and falls in older adults.  That’s the message from an aging specialist from Madison giving a talk at this week’s Science on Tap discussion.    

Winter in the Northwoods means…not a lot of sunshine.  And that means not a lot of Vitamin D.  Dr Neil Binkley is Director of the Osteoporosis Clinical Research program at UW Madison.  WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski talked with Dr. Binkley to find out why Vitamin D supplements might be important for preventing osteoporosis and bone fractures.    

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lazymonkey/348519518/

Dave MacFarland is a large carnivore specialist with the Wisconsin DNR.  He coordinates the state’s wolf and bear management plan, plus its cougar response team.  

He’s also the guest at this week’s Science on Tap discussion at the Minocqua Brewing Company.  WXPR’s Natalie Jablonski spoke with him about what carnivore management looks like in the state.  

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