Wisconsin Public Service

Wisconsin Public Service crews have begun to extend a natural gas pipeline from Crandon to the Forest County Potawatomi Community. 

WPS Spokesperson Leah Van Zile says the project involves about five miles of both new construction and upgrades to existing infrastructure. 

“If we’re looking for any additional expansion beyond the Forest County Potawatomi governmental buildings there, we do need to make sure that our system has enough pressure and is built to the specifications necessary to do any expansions.” 

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gas_meter.JPG

Gasoline prices aren’t the only ones falling. Natural gas prices are also dropping.

Residential rates are about thirty percent lower this January than they were last year.

Wisconsin Public Service spokesperson Leah Van Zile says it depends on how much you use, but you’ll likely see a lower bill. 

Hands-on science learning took a big step forward Tuesday at the Three Lakes School District. The school now has solar panels on its roof thanks to the Solarwise for Schools program sponsored by Wisconsin Public Service.

As part of the Solarwise for Schools program, every school receives 10 solar panels that provide 2.8 kilowatts of electricity. That’s roughly the number of solar panels that could power an average home. Here, that renewable energy will be keeping the hall lights on for the junior high. WPS says the solar panels save a school about $350 a year in energy costs.

Natalie Jablonski / WXPR News

Days after an intense storm system ripped through northern Wisconsin…county road crews are still working to clean up the damage.

Oneida County Highway Commissioner Freeman Bennett says the biggest problem was fallen trees, but county-maintained roads were clear by the end of the day Thursday. 

Wisconsin Public Service is flaring natural gas in Three Lakes this week to prepare for some pipeline maintenance.

WPS Spokesperson Leah Van Zile says some parts of the pipeline are being refitted to allow for easier maintenance, and the natural gas needs to be cleared out first. 

“Basically what we’re doing is we’ve taken the pressure down as low as we possibly can in that section of the pipeline, the remaining gas is purged out of that pipeline, and burned at the one valve in the Three Lakes area.”

Arnoldius via http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_power_plant_Knepper_1.jpg

Advocates and industry leaders are beginning to digest the EPA’s proposed rule package on carbon emissions for power plants.  The plan would require Wisconsin power plants to cut carbon dioxide emissions by an average of 34 percent between 2005 and 2030. 

Keith Reopelle of Clean Wisconsin says the proposed changes are modest ones, and will be economic drivers for clean energy alternatives to fossil fuels.

Tyler Karaszewski / https://flic.kr/p/8W3iNL

Lincoln and Langlade County residents have a chance to upgrade older woodstoves and get a rebate. 

Wisconsin Public Service is urging people in some areas to exchange inefficient wood burning stoves for newer, cleaner ones. 

WPS Spokesperson Lisa Prunty says woodstoves have a big effect on air quality.

Pollo-en.wikipedia.org

Wisconsin Public Service Foundation is offering area fire departments and emergency responders up to a $2,000 grant for needed equipment and training. The Foundation is encouraging all emergency responder agencies to apply for its "Safety-It's Worth the Energy" grant between now and August 1.

WPS' Leah Van Zile says the money is used to enhance operations....

This Saturday marks the end of the winter moratorium on utility shutoffs.  Wisconsin Public Service is urging customers who are behind on their bills to call sooner rather than later…to make payment arrangements. 

State law prevents anyone’s home utilities from being turned off during winter months between November 1st and April 15th, even you don’t pay the bills.

But WPS spokesperson Leah Van Zile says those unpaid bills won’t go away, and customers could face shutoffs if they don’t get in touch with WPS. 

en.wikipedia.org

The large amounts of snow around homes and businesses have led to potentially serious problems: damaging electric and gas meters.

Wisconsin Public Service spokesperson Leah Van Zile says people have been taking snow off their roofs or plowing around meters. The impact of the snow has led to other problems...

 

Pages