Field Notes

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  For this month’s edition of Field Notes, Scott Bowe of Kemp Natural Resources Station talks about the importance of the forest industry and the ecological role it plays when it comes to our forest’s well-being.  

Scott Bowe has taken over Tom Steele’s position at Kemp Station as well as his position in the rotation for Field Notes.

Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology

A new voice will be added to WXPR's airwaves soon.

Scott Bowe has taken over Tom Steele's position as Superintendent of Kemp Natural Resources Station, and he's  taking over Steele's spot for the monthly saga Field Notes. Bowe stopped by the studios last week to record his first episode. Miranda Vander Leest caught up with Bowe about his new on-air and off-air duties. 

Tune in Tuesday, July 12 at 7:45 and 5:45 for Scott Bowe's first episode of WXPR's monthly commentary Field Notes. 

Circu.ed

In this month’s edition of Field Notes, Trout Lake Station Biologist Susan Knight talks about her frustrating project with aquatic invasive species control. 

Frog Songs and Ecosystem Resilience

May 18, 2016

    

The American Beech

Apr 5, 2016
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Spring Foxes

Mar 10, 2016
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The Super El Nino of 2015-16

Jan 13, 2016
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Luke Roberson shows how female mussels spread its offspring: 

What is Animal Magnetism?

Nov 12, 2015
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What Aquatic Invertebrates Are In Your Lake?

Oct 14, 2015
Paul Skawinski

    

Video of freshwater jellyfish: 

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Do you worry that the Northwoods is going nuts? Well, you might be right.  But as Tom Steele explains in this edition of "Field Notes",  that's not necessarily a bad thing. He says  this nuttiness is an important part of our Northwoods environment....

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Next we have the latest "Field Notes" with Trout Lake aquatic biologist Susan Knight. She tells us she's a foremost expert on one particular plant...

Field Notes: Mysterious Bogs

Jun 9, 2015
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Say you were writing a murder mystery set in the Northwoods, and you were looking for a clever place to hide a fictional body. How about bogs? Don’t things just slide into bogs and disappear? Susan Knight is an Associate Scientist at the UW-Madison Trout Lake Station in Boulder Junction, and she’s actually fielded this question--and many others--in her studies of bogs. Explore this peculiar environment in this month's edition of “Field Notes."

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In the next installment of "Field Notes", UW- Madison's  Kemp Natural Resources  Station Director Tom Steele says a bird that now seems commonplace in the Northwoods wasn't so.... not all that long ago....

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