Code Switch
4:15 am
Mon July 21, 2014

The Youth Unemployment Crisis Hits African-Americans Hardest

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 9:50 am

Young people are being chased out of the labor market. Though the national unemployment rate has fallen steadily in recent months, youth unemployment remains stubbornly high, and the jobless rate is even higher among young minorities. For young people between the ages of 16 and 24, unemployment is more than twice the national rate, at 14.2 percent. For African-Americans, that rate jumps to 21.4 percent.

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Shots - Health News
4:15 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Big Data Peeps At Your Medical Records To Find Drug Problems

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:43 pm

No one likes it when a new drug in people's medicine cabinets turns out to have problems — just remember the Vioxx debacle a decade ago, when the painkiller was removed from the market over concerns that it increased the risk of heart attack and stroke.

To do a better job of spotting unforeseen risks and side effects, the Food and Drug Administration is trying something new — and there's a decent chance that it involves your medical records.

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The Two-Way
4:15 am
Mon July 21, 2014

Rubio: Small Government Can Help Fix Economic Inequality

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, shown here at an event in Washington last month, spoke with NPR's Morning Edition about the country's economic challenges.
Molly Riley AP

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 8:07 am

Sen. Marco Rubio, a potential 2016 GOP presidential contender, is concerned about issues of access to affordable education, availability of job training and prospects for economic mobility. While shunning the "income inequality" language of the left, he insists that those problems need to be viewed through the lens of limited government.

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Around the Nation
6:00 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Despite California's Drought, Taps Still Flowing In LA County

A sign over a highway in Glendale, Calif., warned motorists in February to save water in response to the state's severe drought. But a study released earlier this week showed residents in the southern coastal part of the state used more water this spring than they did last year.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 10:52 am

This January, after the driest calendar year in California history, Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency. He called on residents to reduce their water intake by 20 percent.

But downtown Los Angeles doesn't look like a city devastated by the state's worst drought in decades. The city is green with landscaping, and fountains are running. People still water their lawns, wash their cars and fill their pools.

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Fees for past due
5:17 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Second Half Property Taxes Due

Credit Royalbroil-en.wikipedia.org

Property taxpayers are asked to note the second installment payment is due  on July 31.

Oneida County Treasurer Kris Osterman says missing this deadline will result in interest being charged...

"...we take all the payments that are due now that would be your second installment taxes or your delinquent taxes...."

Tax payments received with a postmark after July 31 will accrue an additional 10 ½% penalty and interest charge for late payment.  Penalty and interest will continue to accrue at a rate of 1.5% per month until the bill is paid.

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1 in 4 pregnant women smoke
5:06 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

End Smoking To Help A Child's First Breath

Credit P.Taylor, en.wikipedia.org

Public health officials have made a strong impression that pregnant women should not drink or possibly harm their unborn child. Now an effort to have women cut out smoking during pregnancy is also underway.
Called "First Breath",  health workers hope to get the nearly one-in-four Oneida county women who smoke while pregnant to stop.

Public health nurse and program coordinator Dawn Klink says both mother and child feel the results of smoking...

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Science
4:31 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Sixth-Grader's Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

Scientists previously underestimated the ability of the lionfish to live in less salty water.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 8:24 am

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

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Middle East
4:31 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Death Toll Climbs In Israel-Gaza Conflict Amid Attempts At Cease-Fire

Originally published on Sun July 20, 2014 7:09 pm

Israel widened its operation into Gaza Sunday and each side had the highest death toll of this two-week-old conflict. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Daniel Estrin in Jerusalem about this deadly day.

Remembrances
4:31 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

Actor James Garner Of 'Rockford Files' Dies

Originally published on Sun July 20, 2014 7:09 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Benefits Big Brothers Big Sisters
3:42 pm
Sun July 20, 2014

The Color Dash Comes To Rhinelander High School

Credit Big Brothers Big Sisters

The Color Dash is a Minnesota-based organization whose mission is to raise local money for local causes.

The Color Dash is coming to Rhinelander for a 5K run in August to benefit Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Northwestern Wisconsin. Big Brothers and Big Sisters provides professionally-supported one-to-one mentoring services, serving 450 childen in nine northern counties including Oneida, Vilas,  and Price.

Mary Kinnunen of Big Brothers Big Sisters says this family-friendly 5K race is very different than most fundraising races....

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