The Masked Biologist

Commentator

The Masked Biologist is a weekly commentator on WXPR talking about natural resources and wildlife in the Northwoods. He is anonymous so that he can separate his professional life as a biologist from his personal feelings about the natural world.

Wikimedia Commons

The bird songs continue to increase as winter turns to spring and our migratory bird species return to claim their territory.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines bird migration in relation to their nesting ground selection.

Wikimedia Commons

There are many different signals that spring has arrived. In today’s episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about a regional favorite—sugaring.

Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

As our weather turns to spring, some of our thoughts might turn to winterkill. In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the masked biologist looks at lakes under ice and why winterkill happens.

Jon Preston / National Park Service

After an extended absence, Wisconsin’s elk reintroduction efforts have brought the population levels to a healthy enough level to allow a very small elk harvest this fall.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist takes a brief look at Wisconsin’s largest mammal.

Wikimedia Commons

How do you feel when you think about a wolf killing and eating a deer? Or perhaps you haven’t given it much thought before now?

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines the predator prey relationship of wolves and deer.

WXPR Public Radio

Its back to basics for the Masked Biologist this week, as he talks about the value and importance of continuing education and certification in this episode of Wildlife Matters.

Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

How much do you know about Wisconsin’s rabbits and hares?

In this week’s episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines the lagomorphs of Wisconsin.

Wikimedia Commons

Wildlife needs to adapt to its place on the globe to survive, not to mention thrive.

In this installment of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist takes a look at another generally accepted principle of adaptation to life in the north: Allen’s Rule.

Wikipedia Commons

The winter Olympics are going on now, not only in South Korea but also right here in Wisconsin’s Northwoods. In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist highlights the athletic river otter.

Wikimedia Commons

Deep wintertime appears to be an advantageous time of year for some wildlife species to breed.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist takes a look at the breeding habits of Wisconsin’s CARNIVORA, or carnivorous furbearers.

Looking for a cure for cabin fever? In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist gives us some tips and tricks for viewing and documenting wildlife tracks and scat left in the snow.

While dealing with winter’s worst, we can always grab another blanket or turn up the thermostat to stay comfortable. Wildlife has to rely on finding other ways to try to stay warm.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about thermal cover.

Do you enjoy watching birds at a backyard feeder?

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about two backyard bird feeder surveys that take place every winter.

It is safe to say that we are experiencing a genuine Wisconsin winter right now—the snow, the cold temperatures, short days and seemingly endless nights.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines Bergmann’s rule, which helps explain how our wildlife can handle Northwoods winters.

Bird feeding is the second most popular hobby in the United States (behind gardening), with more than 55 million Americans participating annually.

In this week's edition of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about how, and what, to feed our local and visiting bird species this winter.

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