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Political Crisis In Egypt
2:48 am
Tue July 9, 2013

What Egyptian State TV Says About The State Of Egypt

In an image from a video broadcast on Egyptian state TV, President Mohammed Morsi addresses the nation on July 2 — his final speech before the military deposed him.
Ismael Mohamad UPI /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 7:23 am

It sounded like a slip of the tongue. As millions of Egyptians took to the streets calling for President Mohammed Morsi to step down, state TV anchor George Heshmat casually used the word "revolution" instead of "protests."

This signaled that state TV was beginning to assert its independence from a government that was never a good fit for it anyway. It was clear that something had changed at the voice of the state — even before Morsi was pushed from power.

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Games & Humor
2:43 am
Tue July 9, 2013

A Zombie Horror Game, Inspired By ... A Nature Documentary?

In The Last of Us, a fungus called Cordyceps that commonly infects insects has jumped over to humans, creating a fungal zombie apocalypse.
Naughty Dog

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 10:20 am

The Last of Us is a new survival horror video game and it features — no big surprise — zombie-like creatures. But these are not the same old zombies that have dominated movie and TV screens in the past few years.

Neil Druckmann, creative director for The Last of Us, says he wanted a fresh new way to wipe out humanity — and he found it in a BBC documentary series called Planet Earth, which depicts the scary effects of the Cordyceps fungus.

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U.S.
2:42 am
Tue July 9, 2013

Employers Face Changes After Same-Sex-Marriage Ruling

The Supreme Court's decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act will bring changes to retirement plans, health care and other benefits.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 9:45 am

There are an estimated 225,000 Americans in legally recognized same-sex marriages. The Supreme Court's recent ruling striking down a key provision of the Defense of Marriage Act means they are now eligible for the same federal benefits as straight couples.

Many of those benefits touch the workplace, and employers are beginning to think about the changes they will have to make.

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Heavy Rotation
6:59 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

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Download Valerie June's "Workin' Woman Blues" in this month's edition of Heavy Rotation.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:31 pm

  • WWNO's Gwen Thompkins on "Ballet Class" by Jason Marsalis

Another month, another great mix of new music chosen by public radio's top DJs. Download an explosive new track from Neko Case, discover the Shabazz Palaces-approved Seattle rapper Porter Ray and get to know Valerie June, one of public radio's frontrunners for Best New Artist of 2013. Grab all 10 of our picks below, as chosen by the following contributors:

  • Chris Campbell, DJ at WDET's ALPHA channel in Detroit
  • Lars Gotrich, producer and host of Viking's Choice at NPR Music
  • Anne Litt, DJ at KCRW in Los Angeles
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Around the Nation
5:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Indiana State Fair To Feature Giant Popcorn Ball

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. In China it's the Year of the Snake. In Indiana, it's the year of popcorn. This year's state fair will feature, what else, a giant popcorn ball. A company called Snax in Pax is using a mold that's eight-feet wide. Owner Will Huggins says it will be edible but he doesn't recommend taking a bite. Maybe because it'll be a little stale.

Around the Nation
5:41 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Volunteers Sought For 1813 Flag Project

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

The Fourth of July weekend is over, but celebrations continue, and I'm not talking about left-over fireworks. The Maryland Historical Society is recreating the flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore 200 years ago. Mary Pickersgill and four others sewed the original Star Spangled Banner in 1813. Now volunteers will recreate it using the same type of fabric, stitching and time frame. They have six weeks to complete the 30-by-40 foot flag.

Music
3:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Vibraphone Showcased In Jason Marsalis' 'Ballet Class'

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:03 am

Each month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities at member stations across the country to tell us about a song they can't get enough of. David Greene introduces listeners to member station WWNO's Gwen Thompkins — she's NPR's former East Africa correspondent. Her choice for July's installment of "Heavy Rotation," is "Ballet Class" by the Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet.

Sports
3:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Britain's Own Andy Murray Wins Men's Title At Wimbledon

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 4:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

People in Britain are celebrating a new Wimbledon tennis champion this morning, a man born on their own soil.

(APPLAUSE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Game, that's a match...

GREENE: That's early applause from the crowd yesterday, just before Andy Murray won in straight sets beating Novak Djokovic. Murray's victory ends 77 years of heartbreak. The last Brit to win the Wimbledon men's title: Fred Perry in 1936.

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Education
3:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Congress Called On To Reverse Student Loan Rate Increase

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:02 pm

Rates on federally subsidized Stafford loans, which help low and middle-income college students, doubled on July 1. There is now pressure for a deal to undo the increase. NPR's David Greene talks to Matthew Chingos, a fellow at the Brookings Institution's Brown Center on Education Policy.

Parallels
2:52 am
Mon July 8, 2013

EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops.
Jackie Northam/NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:12 pm

U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement aimed at generating billions of dollars of new trade. But negotiators must overcome barriers created by cultural and philosophical differences over sectors like agriculture. In Europe, the cultivation of genetically modified crops is banned, while in the U.S., they are a central part of food production. NPR's Jackie Northam visited a farm in Delaware and NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited one in Burgundy, France, to look at those deep-seated differences. We hear from Jackie first.

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