climate change

U.S. Forest Service

Forests in the Northwoods and Upper Peninsula may look different in the next century thanks to a warming climate.  Anew report from the U.S. Forest Service predicts fewer of some types of conifers and more hardwoods in northern forests. 

Arnoldius via http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_power_plant_Knepper_1.jpg

Advocates and industry leaders are beginning to digest the EPA’s proposed rule package on carbon emissions for power plants.  The plan would require Wisconsin power plants to cut carbon dioxide emissions by an average of 34 percent between 2005 and 2030. 

Keith Reopelle of Clean Wisconsin says the proposed changes are modest ones, and will be economic drivers for clean energy alternatives to fossil fuels.

Eric Engbretson / US Fish and Wildlife Service

A changing climate could bring one piece of good news for walleye fishermen. 

A study out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison says increasing temperatures in Lake Superior will expand habitat for fish that thrive in slightly warmer water, like walleye, Chinook salmon and lean lake trout.  Researcher Jim Kitchell says that means populations of certain fish in Lake Superior could increase in coming years.