climate change

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Next we hear from Dan Barth of the Citizen's Climate Lobby, Marathon County Chapter.

Barth is the guest speaker Wednesday at noon at the Tomahawk Public Library, speaking at the invitation of the League of Women Voters of the Northwoods.

The Citizen's Climate lobby has a non-partisan proposal, authored by a former President Ronald Reagan Secretary of State, to work on climate change based on a market place solution.

Dan Barth spoke with WXPR's Ken Krall...

Barth says they are hoping to start a chapter of the Citizen's Climate Lobby in the Northwoods.

DNR Quietly Changes Climate Change Stance

Dec 29, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

The state D-N-R no longer blames "human activities" for the heat trapping greenhouse gases which cause climate change.

An agency web page about the Great Lakes now says the reasons for earth's change are being "debated and researched by academic entities." Walker environmental critic and former local leader and news reporter James Rowan uncovered the position change in his blog.

U.S. Forest Service

Forests in the Northwoods and Upper Peninsula may look different in the next century thanks to a warming climate.  Anew report from the U.S. Forest Service predicts fewer of some types of conifers and more hardwoods in northern forests. 

Arnoldius via http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_power_plant_Knepper_1.jpg

Advocates and industry leaders are beginning to digest the EPA’s proposed rule package on carbon emissions for power plants.  The plan would require Wisconsin power plants to cut carbon dioxide emissions by an average of 34 percent between 2005 and 2030. 

Keith Reopelle of Clean Wisconsin says the proposed changes are modest ones, and will be economic drivers for clean energy alternatives to fossil fuels.

Eric Engbretson / US Fish and Wildlife Service

A changing climate could bring one piece of good news for walleye fishermen. 

A study out of the University of Wisconsin-Madison says increasing temperatures in Lake Superior will expand habitat for fish that thrive in slightly warmer water, like walleye, Chinook salmon and lean lake trout.  Researcher Jim Kitchell says that means populations of certain fish in Lake Superior could increase in coming years.