local features

WXPR Public Radio

WXPR is celebrating 35 years on the radio this year.

In this week's episode of A Northwoods Moment in History, local historian Gary Entz tells us exactly what went into that first broadcast back in 1983.

John James Audubon / Wikimedia Commons

Aldo Leopold famously said “to keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering” when talking about preserving threatened and endangered species. When a species is lost, though, should we try to re-create that cog or wheel?

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist introduces us to de-extinction and an ambitious project to bring the passenger pigeon back from the dead.

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR Public Radio

A unique art exhibit has been the focus at ArtStart Rhinelander for the last few weeks.

 

Mackenzie Martin has this report from the opening reception in June.

 

 

 

Over the past two years, Karen Bondarchuk has found more dead birds than at any other time in her life. The exhibit at ArtStart Rhinelander through August 18 is called - And by the Wind Grieved - and it’s all recreations of dead birds, both sculptures and paintings.

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR Public Radio

The number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder has been going up over the years.

Locally, there is a center in the Northwoods that aims to help children on the autism spectrum by using something called behavioral treatment… and they’ve recently expanded to Rhinelander.

Mackenzie Martin has the story.

The space located in Rhinelander’s Riverview Hall looks like a typical preschool with toys and books scattered about. There are some things that help you realize it’s a space for kids on the autism spectrum, though.

8tracks.com/markymark25 / Wikimedia Commons

We've all heard about the fatal plane crash that took the lives of Buddy Holly and many other pioneers of Rock and Roll in 1959. Did you know they had just recently passed through the Northwoods before the crash, though? This week on A Northwoods Moment in History, local historian Gary Entz tells us the whole story.

Knowing Our Oaks

Jul 10, 2018
Max Pixel

In this month's installment of Field Notes Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses Wisconsin’s oaks and how they are used in our daily lives.

Wisconsin Historical Society, Image ID: 71650, wisconsinhistory.org

On days when the weather in northern Wisconsin is particularly bleak, we've all felt sympathy for our mail carriers. This week on A Northwoods Moment in History though, local historian Gary Entz tells us that it used to be a lot worse.

Darren Swim / Wikimedia Commons

Sometimes animals can be so common that they can be taken for granted, what we call the tragedy of the commons.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist expresses his appreciation for the very common blue jay.

I have shared in previous writings my affinity for members of the Corvid family. Corvids are a group of birds that include crows, ravens, jays, and magpies. Of all the birds in that family, I would say Blue Jays are my favorite.

United States Bureau of American Ethnology - Indian Land Cessions in the United States, 1784 to 1894 / Wikimedia Commons

This week on A Northwoods Moment in History, local historian Gary Entz explains the Treaty of St. Peters and how it affects us in the Northwoods today.

US Forest Service / Wikimedia Commons

Frequently our encounters with wildlife are completely safe, but there are always risks for injury or disease if bitten or scratched.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about the prevention and presence of rabies.

Wisconsin Historical Society, Image ID: 28374, wisconsinhistory.org

This week on A Northwoods Moment in History, local historian Gary Entz takes us back to a rather curious bank robbery that took place in Antigo in 1888.

When we hear stories of bank robberies many people automatically think about tales of the Old West or perhaps the gangsters of the 1930s.  However, bank robberies happened in other times and other places as well, and one curious Northwoods bank robbery took place in Antigo during the year 1888.

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration / Wikimedia Commons

Deer are definitely at the top of the list of animals that people love to see while enjoying the Northwoods.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about deer, specifically deer fawn behavior this time of year.

Dorothy Ferguson / Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

This week on A Northwoods Moment in History, local historian Gary Entz takes us back to 1905 and tells us the story of a bindlestiff named Frank Lamperer, who benefitted from the kindness of the people in Rhinelander.

Jacob Shultz

This is the story of two ambulances and a resident in Boulder Junction who felt compelled to help out a small Alaskan town a few weeks ago.

 

WXPR’s Mackenzie Martin takes it from there.

Living in the Northwoods, we often feel like we live in small towns.

Ylem / Wikimedia Commons

It’s the second Tuesday of the month, which is when we check in with our commentators in the field.

In this month’s episode of Field Notes, Susan Knight of Trout Lake Station suggests we take a walk in the dark to see fireflies and other glowing organisms.

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