Local Features

In addition to the local news, WXPR Public Radio also likes to find stories that are outside the general news cycle... Listen below to stories about people, culture, and art in the Northwoods that go a little deeper than a traditional news story allows us to do.

These features are also available as a podcast by searching "WXPR Local Features" wherever you get your podcasts.

Castle, W.I. (William Ivor) / Wikimedia Commons

Every Friday, we turn back the clock on Morning Edition with local historian Gary Entz to find out what life in the Northwoods used to be like. This is part of a new initiative by WXPR to tell the history and culture of northern Wisconsin.

Issues of immigration, military conflicts overseas, and how we honor veterans are current topics of political debate, but this is nothing new.  Consider the case of Rhinelander resident Elwood Smith.

Herbert Lange / Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

You’ve probably heard the saying “never get between a mama bear and her cubs.”

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about the potential dangers of interacting with a large carnivore and steps or precautions to take to minimize your risks.

Jacquelyn Mitchard

A New York Times bestselling author will be giving a talk in Arbor Vitae next week. Jacquelyn Mitchard - probably best known for her book The Deep End of the Ocean - will be speaking at the Red Crown Lodge on Wednesday, May 30th. The event is sponsored by the Friends of the Frank B Koller Library.

Mitchard was a Wisconsin resident for many years, working at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and living just outside of Madison.

Phelps Chamber of Commerce

Every Friday, we turn back the clock on Morning Edition with local historian Gary Entz to find out what life in the Northwoods used to be like. This is part of a new initiative by WXPR to tell the history and culture of northern Wisconsin.

Bladerunner8u / Wikimedia

Chances are, if you haven’t yet seen your first snake of the year, you will soon.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about snakes of northern Wisconsin.

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR

In part one of our series on death care in the Northwoods, we talked to a local funeral director about green funerals and how his job has changed over the years. Today, we’ll hear about those who are choosing to have their funerals at home.

 

WXPR’s Mackenzie Martin reports.

 

 

Mackenzie Martin / WXPR

The death care industry has undergone a lot of changes in recent years and it’s more than just that formal burials are down and cremations are up.

In the first of a two part series about death care in the Northwoods, we’ll hear about green funerals and how the job of a local funeral director has changed. WXPR’s Mackenzie Martin reports.

So it turns out, there are a lot of options when you’re planning a funeral, a lot more than there were 20 or 25 years ago.

dallasmovietheaters / cinematreasures.org

Every Friday, we'll turn back the clock on Morning Edition with local historian Gary Entz to find out what life in the Northwoods used to be like. This is part of a new initiative by WXPR to tell the history and culture of northern Wisconsin.

On July 2, 1954, the citizens of Rhinelander were able to enjoy what was billed as “the last word in theater engineering.”

Peter K Burian / Wikimedia Commons

How much do you know about falconry in Wisconsin? In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines the centuries-old sport of kings.

Knowing Our Maples

May 8, 2018
Kyle Lawrence / Wikimedia Commons

In this month's installment of Field Notes Scott Bowe of Kemp Station discusses Wisconsin’s maples and how they are used in homes and schools.

Wisconsin has seven native maple trees and many more non-native ornamental maples, with some of these considered invasive. We all know the sugar maple, our state tree, but the others are less well known. Let’s look at Wisconsin’s maples and how they are used in our daily lives.

Dwight Burdette / Wikimedia Commons

Organisms change over time in response to the environment around them.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines adaptations and evolution.

John Kees / Wikimedia Commons

Constructing a bird house can be a satisfying activity both when construction is complete and when you see birds successfully using it to raise their young.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist shares some pointers for building a safe and successful bird house.

Wikimedia Commons

The bird songs continue to increase as winter turns to spring and our migratory bird species return to claim their territory.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines bird migration in relation to their nesting ground selection.

Three Spring Beauties

Apr 10, 2018
Contributed Photograph

In this episode of Field Notes, Susan Knight gives us three reasons to look forward to spring.

I am a huge fan of winter.  But once the snow is clearly on its way out, who doesn’t start thinking about spring?  And what says spring better than … skunk cabbage?

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