Wildlife Matters

Did you know that a chipmunk can throw its voice? Or that Wisconsin has a venomous mammal? What about the answer to the question: can porcupines throw their quills?

Every Thursday on WXPR, the Masked Biologist answers questions just like these about living here in the Northwoods. You can email him your own questions here: maskedbiologist@charter.net

Darren Swim / Wikimedia Commons

Sometimes animals can be so common that they can be taken for granted, what we call the tragedy of the commons.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist expresses his appreciation for the very common blue jay.

I have shared in previous writings my affinity for members of the Corvid family. Corvids are a group of birds that include crows, ravens, jays, and magpies. Of all the birds in that family, I would say Blue Jays are my favorite.

US Forest Service / Wikimedia Commons

Frequently our encounters with wildlife are completely safe, but there are always risks for injury or disease if bitten or scratched.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about the prevention and presence of rabies.

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration / Wikimedia Commons

Deer are definitely at the top of the list of animals that people love to see while enjoying the Northwoods.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about deer, specifically deer fawn behavior this time of year.

BrianAsh / Wikimedia Commons

Gardens not only beautify our lives, they benefit pollinators and can even slow runoff and clean the water.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about his own experience with putting in a rain garden.

Gerry from Fort St. John, BC, Canada / Wikimedia Commons

Sometimes its not what you know, but who you know. In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist recalls a photo of a forest floor discovery that required help from a colleague to identify.

Aarongunnar / Wikimedia Commons

This time of year, evenings are heralded by the songs of frogs and toads in our Northwoods lakes and wetlands.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist discusses the importance of wetlands and amphibians.

Herbert Lange / Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

You’ve probably heard the saying “never get between a mama bear and her cubs.”

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about the potential dangers of interacting with a large carnivore and steps or precautions to take to minimize your risks.

Bladerunner8u / Wikimedia

Chances are, if you haven’t yet seen your first snake of the year, you will soon.

In this week's episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about snakes of northern Wisconsin.

Peter K Burian / Wikimedia Commons

How much do you know about falconry in Wisconsin? In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines the centuries-old sport of kings.

Dwight Burdette / Wikimedia Commons

Organisms change over time in response to the environment around them.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines adaptations and evolution.

John Kees / Wikimedia Commons

Constructing a bird house can be a satisfying activity both when construction is complete and when you see birds successfully using it to raise their young.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist shares some pointers for building a safe and successful bird house.

Wikimedia Commons

The bird songs continue to increase as winter turns to spring and our migratory bird species return to claim their territory.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist examines bird migration in relation to their nesting ground selection.

Wikimedia Commons

There are many different signals that spring has arrived. In today’s episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist talks about a regional favorite—sugaring.

Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

As our weather turns to spring, some of our thoughts might turn to winterkill. In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the masked biologist looks at lakes under ice and why winterkill happens.

Jon Preston / National Park Service

After an extended absence, Wisconsin’s elk reintroduction efforts have brought the population levels to a healthy enough level to allow a very small elk harvest this fall.

In this episode of Wildlife Matters, the Masked Biologist takes a brief look at Wisconsin’s largest mammal.

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